Electrical wire
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Joined: April 23, 2004
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Electrical wire
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Posted on Thu Apr 29, 2004 5:54 am
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I ran across an article on here with info on using scrap electrical wire. I can't remember the title...

They said something about using strippers to remove the insulation from electrical wire in chunks. My first project was left over household wiring. I stripped it by using a small razor knife with a segmented blade and laying the wire flat on my work-surface (incidentally, a tool chest with a 3/8" steel plate for a top) and running the knife down the wire. If the wire is realatively straight (or made that way by force) it works best to hold the knife at and angle (away) and pull the wire towards yourself with the other hand. This way the knife is stable and the wire is what is being moved.

I had a buddy I conned into holding tension on the other end so that it was straight and evenly pulled and was able to strip the insulation from nearly 100' of wire in just a few minutes this way.

Smile Jer


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Posted on Thu Apr 29, 2004 3:42 pm
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A friend of mine loves getting wire this way. A 10' section of the big, multi-strand telephone cabling that you can find at places like Home Depot, or as scrap from the right contractors, is pretty cost-effective. With 24-48 strands, that 10' get's mutiplied a lot. I don't know how tight the tolerances are on the wire, but what I've seen appears to be 14AWG. Stripping the insulation is the part that makes me think it's not necessarly as cost effective as he likes.


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Posted on Wed Jul 14, 2004 4:53 pm
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Coif Cool Smiley I've done this also. Most of the stuff I got was coiled. Stripping the outer shell off of it was anoying, but didn't take much time.
What I find to be the most annoying is the unstranding process.
Coif Cool Smiley


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Posted on Tue Apr 26, 2005 8:15 pm
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hey, I've used household wire quite a bit. as far as stripping the casing off, I've made just small jig with a razorblade and a few nuts and bolts to hold it at an angle against my work bench.. it works like a top and I get 3 times the length of usable wire..

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Posted on Wed Apr 27, 2005 3:27 am
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i do something similar, i get cable which is comprised of 19strands of 12g copper from an electrician i know. i generally use a box cutter and make a long slit through the side all the way down, though i usually cut it into sections as 50-70ft of 12g is rather unwieldy.


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Posted on Thu Aug 25, 2005 9:45 pm
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CyberKender wrote:
A friend of mine loves getting wire this way. A 10' section of the big, multi-strand telephone cabling that you can find at places like Home Depot, or as scrap from the right contractors, is pretty cost-effective. With 24-48 strands, that 10' get's mutiplied a lot. I don't know how tight the tolerances are on the wire, but what I've seen appears to be 14AWG. Stripping the insulation is the part that makes me think it's not necessarly as cost effective as he likes.


Interesting you mentioned Telephone cable the UK stuff is insanely fine, (no real use for chainmail) although I've always thought that it had possiblilities for a version of tablet weaving that would yeald an extremely strong and beautiful fabric. It's on my "to do" list anyway.

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Posted on Wed Sep 14, 2005 7:55 am
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I get my fine jewelry copper from a six strand double insulater exterior phone cable tat was dumped on up... like... 1,000 feet of it. So, I just cut a 50 foot section, cut off the rectangular black insulation on the outside, and I get six wires, red, greed, blue, and then red/white, green/white, and blue/white. I tie those to a stable post (a ballhitch works great) and I walk along it, using my thumb to press it against my kife, cutting the insulation off of the actual copper, which I don't even know the guage of... >.> It makes a realy, really nice byzantine when at 0.08" id. so... yeah. And the copper work hardens nicely, for it's thin size.


Maille Code V2.0 T6.7 R5.3 Eo.f Fbyz MAg Whi$ Cew$ G3.25/0.55 I12.7/1.42 W24.29 Pa Dacdejtw Xa2g20p4t0w5 S03

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Posted on Thu Sep 15, 2005 8:03 am
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Celtic Chainman wrote:
I get my fine jewelry copper from a six strand double insulater exterior phone cable tat was dumped on up... like... 1,000 feet of it. So, I just cut a 50 foot section, cut off the rectangular black insulation on the outside, and I get six wires, red, greed, blue, and then red/white, green/white, and blue/white. I tie those to a stable post (a ballhitch works great) and I walk along it, using my thumb to press it against my kife, cutting the insulation off of the actual copper, which I don't even know the guage of... >.> It makes a realy, really nice byzantine when at 0.08" id. so... yeah. And the copper work hardens nicely, for it's thin size.


Yup! Copper in byzantine looks really cool.
http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/pics/20836cop_steel2.jpg

Sorry about the pinched ends, didn't have a decent saw at that point.

Yes, I know what you mean, I've messed around with insulation cutters but nothing beats a stanley knife and a steady hand. I do tend to find that you've got to concentrate on your knife angle though as you can easily take a nic out of the copper, leaving a rough blemish that needs filing down later. That said it is the best and quickest way of stripping.

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Posted on Sat Apr 08, 2006 10:32 pm
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I've done a lot of copper stripping in my last 2 projects (1200m / 4000ft) of r90 14g copper and stipped it all.by hand.

I cut a bunch of 10-20' chunks throw them in a tub of hot water to warm them up a bit.and and then grab one and fasten one end to something solid and draw it out to get any kinks out.

I use these strippers to cut the insulation every 2-3ft.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=42101

Usualy I can stick my thumbnail in the insulation break and it pulls off fairly easily. If I'm doing a lot I use a fork instead of my thumbnail. After it's stipped I draw it again to kill the kinks.

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Posted on Sun Jan 14, 2007 4:08 pm
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i have also found out that RG6 coax cable works great and yields a decent quality 20g (approx) copper coated steel...it can be a pain to strip but if you have a pair of electrician's wire strippers it goes easier. take the wire and use the strippers like a pair of scissors (using the notched end, not the cutter part) and make cuts every 2 in or so along the cable. after that, give the first section a few twists and then pull it off the wire...a razor blade is not recommended for this wire due to the weave of fine steel mesh just under the outermost layer of insulation...i have found that it will eat through the blade EXTREMELY fast.

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Posted on Sun Jan 14, 2007 4:09 pm
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i have also found out that RG6 coax cable works great and yields a decent quality 20g (approx) copper coated steel...it can be a pain to strip but if you have a pair of electrician's wire strippers it goes easier. take the wire and use the strippers like a pair of scissors (using the notched end, not the cutter part) and make cuts every 2 in or so along the cable. after that, give the first section a few twists and then pull it off the wire...a razor blade is not recommended for this wire due to the weave of fine steel mesh just under the outermost layer of insulation...i have found that it will eat through the blade EXTREMELY fast.

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Posted on Sun Jan 14, 2007 4:09 pm
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i have also found out that RG6 coax cable works great and yields a decent quality 20g (approx) copper coated steel...it can be a pain to strip but if you have a pair of electrician's wire strippers it goes easier. take the wire and use the strippers like a pair of scissors (using the notched end, not the cutter part) and make cuts every 2 in or so along the cable. after that, give the first section a few twists and then pull it off the wire...a razor blade is not recommended for this wire due to the weave of fine steel mesh just under the outermost layer of insulation...i have found that it will eat through the blade EXTREMELY fast.

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Posted on Sun Jan 21, 2007 5:26 pm
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Is coated electrical wire gauged by the coated width or by the actual wire within the coating?

I have some 14 gauge green coated copper wire that seems more like 16 gauge without the coating...

Joined: February 02, 2007
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Posted on Mon Feb 19, 2007 10:20 pm || Last edited by darksidedsam on Mon Feb 19, 2007 10:22 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Stripping wire does take a while but it can be worth it.. UGH 2x post sorry !

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Posted on Mon Feb 19, 2007 10:21 pm
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i found shed loads of scrap copper insulated wire and stripped it .. got me like ?200 in scrap value

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