Cutting rings with a flex shaft
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Joined: June 6, 2019
Posts: 31
Submissions: 0
Location: Brazil

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Posted on Fri Jan 17, 2020 9:41 pm
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First day of going with the project, didn't go so well:












Just a sample of the pieces of wood I'm working with here, these are scraps from a crate from a grocery store nearby, which isn't great because it turns out this wood is rather hard to work with (but the hardness may be good as a support for working).
My first try was cutting a X at the center of the piece, with a jeweler's saw, it isn't great for this purpose, while it provides a pretty clean cut, the wood is hard enough to quickly have a toll on the blade, and it was challenging to cutting in a straight line.
My second attempt to cut a straight V shape, on both cuts with the small saw on the other side it strayed off the same amount, and keeping it straight was a challenge, and soon enough the blade started to bend too much and broke.

In both cases I got a decent place for settling the coil though, but something that wouldn't work for what I want, there is no way to remove the V piece without cutting the whole thing apart (making it three pieces, like fourth picture). I only was able to cut that little piece in the second picture with a circular saw, and that was because it was very shallow and close to the end.

Turns out cutting V shape in a piece of wood, or any diagonal cut is extremely hard, specially when done by hand. I did have a chance to play out with the shaft motor, the rotary saw and carving heads, the saw is too unyielding to cut properly, the wood is hard enough and will burn if using too much speed, so drilling and carving are also a pain.

At the end of the day I did have a breakthrough though, which will be my idea for tomorrow.
First the last picture, I'm cutting this piece in half on its sectional side (also tried with the small saw but nearly broke it, doing it with a regular saw is good enough), I'll then leave the ends of the piece intact, drill in the middle and cut a X shape from there, I think this will get closer to jump ringer type of thing that I can think off, while having the top and bottom as solid pieces.
Another idea that I have is to just use a V shaped thing with sanding paper, and sand my way into the block, I think this will work best, but you will have to wait picture to see exactly what I mean.

Joined: June 6, 2019
Posts: 31
Submissions: 0
Location: Brazil

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Posted on Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:01 pm
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Alright guys, sorry for the long to reply back, over the weekend the store wasn't open to buy sanding paper, but over the week I managed to get the project done:



The idea was to use that aluminum piece (precise 90° angle), wrap the sanding paper around it and dig away. It works, through a lot of work and lot quickly eating up the sanding paper, but at the very least it work pretty well. I also cut a straight guide with a regular saw through the pieces to help it out.

The end result was pretty good, as you can see by the couple last pictures. I did a vertical and horizontal piece, both with a slight angle for the coil to sit, how well they perform only time will tell, but after some testings I remembered how I came up with the previous design.
When cutting with the saw you need three things:
1- a good resting place for the coil so it doesn't wiggle around
2- a strong stopper for when you pulling the saw in the direction of the cut (your hand wont do)
3- a stopper for when you're pulling the saw back (your hand could do)

The vertical support works great for step 2, when cutting, but not so great when pulling back, has a awkward hand placement you want to hold the coil. The horizontal support is much better for holding the coil with your hand, but tends to be a pain the ass when pulling back as it seems to pull the coil back as well.
I guess the ideal setup would a proper 45° angle on the support between the coil and saw, for the best compromise. Still I think these pieces will work well for the moment, my thought is to use the vertical one for bigger thicker coils, the horizontal one for the medium average sized ones, and my previous one for the really thin wires.

As you can see, none of it came out resembling anything akin to a jump ringer after all, kinda gave up on using the rotary saw, since even with the support its quite hard to yield and I would not have one of the most important parts of it (the one that goes over the mandrel). Maybe it could work with the horizontal support if I hold the mandrel in place and feed the coil with the other hand, but still, I would rather have precision and safety.

Lessons learned:
Later I saw that some wooden carving tools could really have helped me along the way. The one thing the flex shaft was really good for was drilling holes. Still you got to be careful when hammering nails in, a break in the wood could cost you the whole piece.

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