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Need your help on a Great Opportunity
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Posted on Wed Mar 17, 2010 2:46 pm
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As I was adding a maille viewing event to this thread http://www.mailleartisans.org/board/viewtopic.php?p=196911#196911 I made the decision to contact the museum to see if they had any other information on the Indo-Persian maille that they had on display.

The curator replied that they only knew that the maille was riveted and that was all the technical data that they had on it.

HERE IS WHERE I NEED YOUR HELP!

In her response she said that after the exhibit closes in September I could make an appointment to study the maille in greater detail if I would like.

I have never had the opportunity to study period maille up close so what would you recommend I look for, examine? So far I have:

1. ID and WD
2. Weave used
3. Orientation of maille.


Any help, suggestions, comments would be great![/url]


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Posted on Wed Mar 17, 2010 2:58 pm
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Look at the edging.

Look at areas like armpits and other joints to see if areas are constructed differently.


Other things you may want to bring/consider.

Bring a pair or two of acid free cotton gloves, if they let you handle the mail. To avoid rusting the mail from the oils left by your fingers.

Try to use plastic measuring devices as to scratch or mare the mail.

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Posted on Wed Mar 17, 2010 3:10 pm
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Bring a good quality digital camera that can get really detailed close-up shots and use a common object of known size for scale.


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Posted on Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:28 pm
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I think the pattern would be important as well. Treat it like you would cloth, like figuring out the pattern for a regular shirt or pair of pants or gloves. Also, I'd say look out for anything that's non-maille--cloth/leather backing, metal plates, etc., or evidence of this sort of thing. Maybe get a density (pick it up and go "Oh, that's heavy" or "Huh, that's pretty light").

Good things for scale: dollar bills (about 6" long), coins (pennies seem to be the standard for maille, it looks like), rullers (obviously), massonry hammers (you probably won't have one, but I'll know the size if you include one in your pictures Very Happy ).

And I just want to add, I'm jealous. I always seem to run into guards when I look closely at period maille. Sad Smile

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Posted on Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:34 pm
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Maybe a total weight for the complete piece.

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Posted on Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:04 pm
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Detail on the type of overlap.

e.g.
Is the whole ring flattened or just the overlap?
How much overlap is there?
What type of rivet? Wedge/pin?
See if you can tell how it was punched.
How tidy are the overlaps? Rabbits ears or nice and clean?

[sneaky]....if you can bend a ring without being seen.... how malleable/hard is the wire the maille is constructed from?[/sneaky]

An estimate of rings in the piece. Maybe count a small measured patch and scale up by area for a guestimate. (I'm not suggesting counting every ring Very Happy )

That's all I can think of to add at the moment. If anything else comes to mind I'll add it later.

Dave

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Posted on Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:29 pm
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thanks all for the suggestions. I will get the opportunity to look at the maille in September so if you think of anything else just jot it down. I hope to go to the museum within the week to again look at the pieces on display and than I can give more specific information on what kinds of things I may get to examine. I know for sure that there are some head pieces and one byrnie (I think).


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Posted on Fri Mar 19, 2010 2:55 pm
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Stry - anything in particular when looking at the construction of the armpits? I have read a great deal about making them but never done it yet.

ManowarDave - How could I figure out how it was punched for the rivet? Are there any markers or signs to look for?


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Posted on Fri Mar 19, 2010 3:09 pm
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The shape of the hole and rivet. Triangular or round etc. Really the method will depend on the type of rivet used. The back of the overlap may give clues too - amount of material pushed aside/direction of push etc.

Lots of close-up photo's then we can all chip in. (Start practicing your macro photography). Very Happy

Dave

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Posted on Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:55 pm
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Nothing in particular, joints have always been the weakest place on armor, and it may be interesting to see how they attempted to solve the problem.

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Posted on Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:00 pm
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Thanks for the input guys!

Yes, I have been practicing my macro photography lately ( and I still stink) Confused


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Posted on Thu Mar 25, 2010 2:02 am
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By "triangular rivet" Dave means triangular along its length, not in section. Looks kind of like a 1/72 scale pizza slice. The pointy bit goes in first and the wide end clinches the join. Then the pointy bit is upset into a rivet head. Done well, this looks like about nothing on the side with the wide part, and a tiny bead or gumdrop shape on the upset end of the rivet. Quite often that side of the link overlap is less completely punched through than the other side, so the point of the triangular rivet has to force its way through and will stay in place while you reach for the clinching tongs or the finishing nail punch while putting that link on a mini anvil to whack everything together.


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Posted on Thu Mar 25, 2010 1:39 pm
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Thanks for the explanation Konstantin the Red by the time I get to look at the pieces I hope to have a check sheet of things to look for and your explanation describes things perfectly.


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Posted on Thu Mar 25, 2010 5:51 pm
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Unless there are actually rivets that have popped loose it might be difficult to tell if it uses wedge or round rivets. Often corrosion and wear leave them looking about the same on the outside.


www.mailletec.com

Y'know, that might just be crazy enough to work!

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