Enameling post-weaving?
View previous topic | View next topic >
Post new topic Reply to topic
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Knitting Circle
   
Author Message

Joined: March 11, 2010
Posts: 115
Submissions: 9
Location: NOLA

Enameling post-weaving?
Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:59 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Is it possible to spray enamel on maille after its woven and have it come out well? I was trying to think of ways to protect against tarnishing and turning peoples skin various colors.

(I was thinking of hanging the mail, spraying it, then shaking it till dry so the rings couldn't glue themselves together.)

Joined: December 19, 2009
Posts: 246
Submissions: 3
Location: Chippewa Falls, Wis

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Mar 15, 2010 4:49 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

you could do what you explained, but i would tend to think your results would not be something you'd be happy with. as the enamel begins to dry it gets tacky, and as the rings are making contact with each other then then separating, it could pull the enamel off parts of some rings and you would more then likely end up with a rough finish.

if i recall correctly in one of the 2 Japanese mail threads here there was some discussion about lacquering mail but i don't recall right off hand which one it was in.

also what kind of material are you using for weaving? there are some tips and tricks floating around on here about various different methods to prevent turning peoples skin colors depending on the materiel.

Joined: April 02, 2008
Posts: 2276
Submissions: 42
Location: Lincoln, NE

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Mar 15, 2010 3:15 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

If you are looking for a brown/black enamel I have used it on galvy before without any ill effects. I have never tried it on any other metals, but I would assume that it would work the same. All it is is Olive Oil Pam sprayed on and baked in the oven on broil as hot as you can get the oven for about 45 min. Flip piece over and repeat. After you are done rinse and wear. I used it on a coin purse that I use constantly and now after about a year and a half things have finally flaked off, but the galvy now looks like stainless.


Once you stop learning, you stop living, so...
Ask questions.
Try new things.
Share what you know.

MailleCode V2.0 T5.3 R4.4 E0.0 Feur MFe.sBr Wg Cwb G.7-5.1 I3.1-11 N20.5 Pj Dcdjt Xa1w2 S08

Joined: March 11, 2010
Posts: 115
Submissions: 9
Location: NOLA

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:28 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I'm looking for a way to apply clear enamel to brass or bronze (or hard copper) so that it doesn't tarnish or react with the skin. It would also be useful for protecting people from nickel.

Copper enamel rings are dead soft so I'd rather not use that. Brass and bronze don't seem to come enameled at all.

I could do rings individually I suppose but I'm not sure how that would hold up to opening and closing the rings.

Joined: April 02, 2008
Posts: 2276
Submissions: 42
Location: Lincoln, NE

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:43 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Sorry, the method I suggested would not work for you than. Crying (very sad)

I have been told that when the Japanese lacquered their maille they had to break away the rings from each other so your spraying idea may work just so you know there may be some rings you need to "break free". Since you are doing a clear coat it shouldn't change the look of it and would theoretically only happen is small spots so shouldn't react with the skin in the small spots that are bare.


Once you stop learning, you stop living, so...
Ask questions.
Try new things.
Share what you know.

MailleCode V2.0 T5.3 R4.4 E0.0 Feur MFe.sBr Wg Cwb G.7-5.1 I3.1-11 N20.5 Pj Dcdjt Xa1w2 S08

Joined: May 07, 2008
Posts: 3615
Submissions: 149
Location: Germany, Herxheim

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Mar 15, 2010 6:38 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

...and, if the enamel is built up in several, extra thin layers, with sufficient drying and hardening time inbetween, this would maybe even work with rings 'glued' a bit together, breaking free, playing a bit around, and application of next layer, so the complete piece is covered in an enamel layer of sufficient thickness after the third or fourth pass - the more passes, the better the result - I propose to try this with small test patches, and different lacquer types - PolyUrethane-, Acrylic-, Cellulose lacquer, etc... (don't forget to report thereafter) Very Happy

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper MAl Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Ps Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hip

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: April 02, 2008
Posts: 2276
Submissions: 42
Location: Lincoln, NE

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Mar 15, 2010 6:57 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I would agree that Zili's suggestion of multiple layers is a good idea. And Please report the results I know that this has come up other times with no results back. Very Happy


Once you stop learning, you stop living, so...
Ask questions.
Try new things.
Share what you know.

MailleCode V2.0 T5.3 R4.4 E0.0 Feur MFe.sBr Wg Cwb G.7-5.1 I3.1-11 N20.5 Pj Dcdjt Xa1w2 S08

Joined: March 11, 2010
Posts: 115
Submissions: 9
Location: NOLA

Reply with quote
Posted on Tue Mar 16, 2010 4:46 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

May I suggest a formal method to this then?

Weave a few samples in copper, various weaves and sizes. coat them in multiple layers as suggested, breaking free the rings and working them between coats. At the end when all coats are dry, do a dramatic surface treatment. If there are any spots that tarnish during the treatment then spots were missed. that way we can visually verify the success.

Anyone got some extra copper rings at hand?

Joined: March 23, 2010
Posts: 4
Submissions: 0

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Mar 25, 2010 8:59 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

think I may try something I read before about painting motorcycle tanks. I will do a top coat of clear enamel and let dry. Then I plan to run it through a tumbler with super fine grit. I will repeat the process until coated sufficiently. Will the enamel do anything to the tumbler though?

Joined: August 30, 2008
Posts: 3138
Submissions: 20
Location: Burlington, ON, Canada

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:44 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

rik888 wrote:
think I may try something I read before about painting motorcycle tanks. I will do a top coat of clear enamel and let dry. Then I plan to run it through a tumbler with super fine grit. I will repeat the process until coated sufficiently. Will the enamel do anything to the tumbler though?


If you're worried, you could try doing your tumble INSIDE a ziploc bag or something...



Joined: March 27, 2009
Posts: 1015
Submissions: 4
Location: Southeastern Minnesota

Reply with quote
Posted on Fri Mar 26, 2010 6:47 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Daemon_Lotos wrote:
rik888 wrote:
think I may try something I read before about painting motorcycle tanks. I will do a top coat of clear enamel and let dry. Then I plan to run it through a tumbler with super fine grit. I will repeat the process until coated sufficiently. Will the enamel do anything to the tumbler though?


If you're worried, you could try doing your tumble INSIDE a ziploc bag or something...

Will the enamel do anything to the ziploc? Would that even work the same? I have no idea, really.

How different is the enamel you are going to use from the enamel used on copper for EC? EC can be tumbled without a problem, so I don't see how your enamel would affect anything, as long as it's completely dry before tumbling.

Post new topic Reply to topic
Jump to:  
Page 1 of 1
All times are GMT. The time now is Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:05 pm
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Knitting Circle
Display posts from previous: