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Joined: October 06, 2004
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My Head Hurts!
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Posted on Sat Apr 02, 2005 3:43 am
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I just bought a lot of 14 gauge Titanium wire and I can't decide on a weave for the vest I want to make!!!! I want it to be strong, yet flexible.
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Crying (very sad)

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Joined: December 29, 2004
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Posted on Sat Apr 02, 2005 12:48 pm
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you obviosly have MUCH to learn. You know E 4-1 right? If not, then I understand your plight. However, I you have just started, you should not be using 14 gauge TITANIUM!!! Try galvy. If you want a somewhat stiffer weave try 6-1. That's only if your a begginer.

If not, try something weird, like gridlock.


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Posted on Sat Apr 02, 2005 8:27 pm
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Much to learn Laughing
I see nothing wrong with Ti. (unless you like a small and not muscular person.
Its a nice strong (costly) metal.
I would definitly suggest Euro 4in1 that in 7/16" ID since its a higher aspect ration and since Ti is so strong. Or 3/8" and hope for spring back.
Ti. is a tough metal so dont try a low Aspect Ratio.

And no yelling in the Title. Using ALL caps is considered yelling.


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Posted on Sun Apr 03, 2005 12:19 am
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i agree with the 4n1 if your just starting out (only with a id of 5/16.), and if not make it out of somthing that would make us think you are crazy...like the rest of us..lol

i like 6n1 euro but you could do a 12in2 jap pattern? its up to you lad, just use your imagination..and have fun with it


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Posted on Sun Apr 03, 2005 5:47 am
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We have an entire Gallery full of weaves, as well as an Articles section full of tutorials on how to weave weaves.

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Posted on Sun Oct 02, 2005 7:23 am
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uhm...

titanium is just as strong as steel only lighter(and more expensive)

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Posted on Mon Oct 03, 2005 4:21 am
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Quote:
titanium is just as strong as steel only lighter(and more expensive)

it's alittle bit stronger and alot springyer and definetly lighter, a shirt 'll only way 10 lbs or so instead of 30.
But yah, I would definetly use euro 4-1, works really well for garments.


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Posted on Mon Oct 03, 2005 4:39 am
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It's really not as simple as saying titanium is stronger/softer/equal to steel. There are many factors in its relative toughness... All I can say is I applaud you for using it, but be prepared for a LOT of springback (hey, it's part of what makes titanium so great). It's a headache, but worth it.

14 ga is going to be hellish. But you'll make STRONG armor.

(actually the shirt would weigh like 18 pounds instead of 30, but still, big improvement)

I say: don't waste titanium on E4-1. Machines can make E4-1. Half the point of mailling yourself is doing different weaves.

If you're experienced, Elfweave is one of the coolest weaves out there. Or, since you're already working with such a damn strong material, you could go for a really tough weave like Interwoven 4-1 or Dwarfmaille. (I'd recommend 5/16 ID for elfweave, 3/8 for the other two, tight and will be hard to make but worth it... if you're making armor, make armor, make it dense)

If you are a beginner... you'll have a hard enough time with 14 ga titanium. I recommend E6-1, it's a really satisfying weave and not too difficult. OR Kingsmaille, virtually identical to E4-1 but a lot niftier and probably stronger. um... 3/8 ID would probably do for both, but for kingsmaille you might need 7/16.

Anxious to see what you're gonna make!

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Posted on Tue Oct 04, 2005 6:22 am
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I rather wonder at speaking of a gauge number with Ti wire -- isn't that stuff invariably designated with its decimal inch or metric actual diameter?

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Posted on Tue Oct 04, 2005 2:57 pm
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I wasted quite a bit of wire trying to figure out how to
get a weave to look right.
I threw away failures, but if you use Titanium, you will want to take apart and try again.
I would suggest practice with a cheap wire to figure out what to do, and then move into the titanium.
Less costly and little loss if you screw up. (which most people do, otherwise experience wouldn't matter)


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Posted on Wed Oct 05, 2005 4:41 am
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Can anyone comment on how easy titanium rings are to close?
Because copper is like butter, galvy is like bread, and stainless is well, a pain..
so is it worth the money for the lighter, just as strong material.... or is it WAY MORE work...
Is titanium harder to close? I think for my motor bike gear I need to use the lightest, strongest material( AND WEAVE) as possible.
I think titanium is the way to go, but I've never worked with it...
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Posted on Wed Oct 05, 2005 7:02 am
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Konstantin: True enough, but if you buy it from TRL, which I highly recommend, they give it a Ga number. In some cases there is some variation within the ga they designate though, which you can find out on the page and specify in your order.

Titanium is a bitch to work with. I'm not sure what to compare it to. I've never worked with stainless, but I expect it's fairly springy. Titanium I guarantee is worse. I've been making some stuff with a bit of 20 ga titanium wire I got, and I've found that bending a 3/16 ID loop, I need to usually bend it a fair distance (like 3-5 times the width of the wire) past closed to get it to spring back to the right place. About twice as far as I'd have to bend it for any other springy material I've worked with. Um.. I've found brass to be very springy, if you've ever worked with that, (I imagine stainless is about the same), I'd say approximately twice as springy.

So, a pain, but on the other hand, SO worth it. I love my titanium. Once I got the hang of working with it (wasted more loops than I'd care to think about... titanium complains a lot if you keep bending it) I found it really satisfying. I highly recommend pre-closing some to decrease the amount of opening and closing you do, for this reason.

I am HIGHLY in favor of using titanium for mailling, so I encourage you to use it for your motorbike gear. It's nice and light, and probably even better than steel for your purposes. Its resilience is it's greatest strength, and the amount of give it has would probably actually be an advantage over steel, in the event of a crash. That is to say, it would flex a little better, and therefore not tear apart as easily, while one is, say, skidding across asphalt. This is pure theory, mind you, and if someone's more knowledgeable about how titanium maille actually holds up in such conditions, please correct me.

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Posted on Wed Oct 05, 2005 1:54 pm
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Hmm, none of the half-hard brass that I've worked with is very springy. If anything, more like copper than the stainless (which drove me nuts until I got used to it). 14g Ti ... ouch. Just another question ... what's niobium like compared to say sterling, copper and stainless?

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