please make the pain go away
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Joined: January 29, 2005
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please make the pain go away
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Posted on Fri Feb 04, 2005 7:56 pm
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ok i have a little prob the only way can get some weaving done with some sorth of speed is to close the links by my hands. (bare hands). having tools or gloves just slowes me down. my only prob now is after a day of weaving i have to take a 2 day breack or so do to my hands being so sore.

so my question is there anything i can do to help with the sorness in my finger tips. or am I a just going to have to tough it out?


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Joined: February 06, 2004
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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 1:18 am
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first off this topic is better suited for the knitting circle. this forum is more for help with the MAIL site. like stuff not loading or comming up with error messages when clicking links. also alot of members don't check this forum, they usually stick to the knitting circle and chat forum.

what ring size are you working with? it could be that you are using tools that aren't suited well for the size as to why you can't get any speed. course i don't have any speed anyways, but that fine for me. my second suggestion is putting some 'new skin' liquid bandage on your fingers. i know this helps with preventing blisters (i use it before i go golfing). and my third suggestion is to work for a day, then rest for a day, and push through the pain the next day. this will help build up calloses which will lessen the pain.


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Joined: March 07, 2004
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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 3:30 am
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arniflora gel... get it at your local whole foods market or herbal drug store


Are there washing instructions?
Gu-burii sabiri

www.chouschains.tk

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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 7:19 am
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umm.. perhaps you could try using 2 pairs of pliers???


you all laugh cuz im different. i laugh cuz your all the same
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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 9:44 am
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I think I know where you are coming from on this one. When I started out I used some 5/8th i.d. 10gauge aluminum wire I had scrounged from work. BIG bulky rings but they worked really well to learn the weaves and I could bend them with my fingers. After awhile my index fingers and thumbs would get numb but the rings were too big to use pliers on effectively, especially when I was just learning the weaves. The answer to your problem could be the same as mine was. If you are comfortable with the weaves you are using switch to smaller rings and start using pliers. If you are using 3/8th i.d. rings or larger you can get away with using your fingers to do all the work. If you get any smaller you need pliers. The rings are just too stout.

Joined: March 27, 2002
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Re: please make the pain go away
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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 11:22 am
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Phoenix wrote:
. . .the only way can get some weaving done with some sort of speed is to close the links by my hands. (bare hands). Having tools or gloves just slows me down.


Practice with the pliers, Phoenix. Pain is why we don't use our fingers. With practice you'll get faster. The secret is, don't ever put the pliers down -- use your pliers as metal hands, and always think how you might shave a second here and there off of this motion or that. Don't pick your mailpatch up, either, but keep it down on your worksurface, especially when it's still little. That is the secret to speed -- and happy fingers. Instead it will be your palms that get sore until they adapt, and the way to accomplish that is to only weave mail until the first slight pain, and then down tools -- you're done weaving for the day. Go to coiling or cutting if you've still got the maille urge. Cutting's easiest on your hands if you're using a small bolt cutter, 14 or 18 inch size, for then you're not using just your hand, but the muscles of your whole arm. These go through wire "like buttah."


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: January 29, 2005
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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 12:47 pm
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well first off i'm useing 14guage wire with 1/2 inch id and i have my weave hanging up on a pice of playwood. i can use my niddle nose and linesmens pliers verry well it's just i have to set my linesmens players down to weave the open link with them in my hands i endup droping the link or messing up on the weave or i will drop the closed link when i go to grab the closed link with the linesmens pliers. with my bare hands i can weave add the closed link and close the open link in one motion about. but thank you all for the info i will try them out.


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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 2:01 pm
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perhaps your linesmans pliers are too big for your hands. With any of your tools, you should be able to touch your thumb to about the first knuckle while holding them. The tools should rest in the lowest joint of your fingerst and in the muscle at the base of your thumb.

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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 4:46 pm
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I had similar problems when I started - I just wasn't that competant using my pliers to do everything, so I'd put them down, set things up, maybe put a ring out with my hands, pick them up again, etc.

It wasn't until I got a better grasp of how everything worked that I was able to start using them more and more and that's when you start developing speed and agility.

While it might seem like you're faster using your hands now, you will plateau at this speed. You will only be able to get past that with using pliers more and more and being able to manipulate the weave and rings with pliers only.

Good luck - and don't be afraid to experiment with different pliers and holding them differently.


Yes, it hurt.

Joined: December 14, 2004
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Posted on Sun Feb 06, 2005 6:47 pm
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MikeB is right. when I teach classes, i tell people that although pliers might seem like the hard way, they're the fastest way to make maille. this happened with me, my cousin, and most maillers i know. just keep using the pliers, and you'll eventually become so good with them, its like they're a part of you.

practise makes perfect!

Joined: January 20, 2005
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Posted on Mon Feb 07, 2005 4:01 am
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my suggeston, get tools that you can hold while making maille or, if that still dont work, use a bandage, duct tape or hockey tape to help your fingers, or as earlier mentioned work then rest then bite the pain

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Posted on Mon Feb 07, 2005 9:25 am
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Phoenix wrote:
Well, first off I'm using 14 gauge wire with 1/2 inch id and i have my weave hanging up on a piece of plywood. I can use my needle nose and linesmen's pliers very well; it's just I have to set my linesmen's pliers down to weave the open link with them in my hands I end up dropping the link or messing up on the weave or I will drop the closed link when I go to grab the closed link with the linesmen's pliers.


To repeat what everyone else told you too, Phoenix, practice. You'll get it -- cultivate patience. It's something like learning to play an instrument -- takes a while.

Go ahead and capitalize. Capitalization is not only your friend, it is ours too. (I tend to be a stern taskmaster about people's grammar.) Good punctuation makes it much easier for us to see where sentences begin and end, and this helps your ideas waft through cyberspace and land in our frontal lobes where you want them to go. Efficiency, you know.

I think I see part of your difficulty, though: for butted mail that big, use anything but needlenose pliers. You want something with a broad jaw, not a needle -- those guys don't give a good grip, and wide-jawed pliers are easier to use, especially on that quite loose 14 gauge. I never bother with hanging the stuff from a board; I prefer to work on a slightly resilient surface like indoor/outdoor carpet, and to keep the mailpatch down on the surface, sliding the link to be woven into place and then closing it with the mail still lying on the carpet. Much less chance that way for links to fall out of position or clear out of your grip.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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Posted on Mon Feb 07, 2005 12:25 pm
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I had the same problems. I'd constantly put the pliers down, grab a ring, pick up the pliers and open it, put the pliers down, insert ring into weave, pick up pliers and close ring, repeat.

I found this image to be of help:

http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/pics/10145tools.jpg
Thanks Hockeywierdo!

My problem was that I couldn't keep a handle on the pliers. So I made a way that I could utilizing duct tape and mason's twine. Now they are just an extension of my fingers.

Konstantin the Red wrote:
I never bother with hanging the stuff from a board; I prefer to work on a slightly resilient surface like indoor/outdoor carpet, and to keep the mailpatch down on the surface, sliding the link to be woven into place and then closing it with the mail still lying on the carpet. Much less chance that way for links to fall out of position or clear out of your grip.


I like to use the neoprene side of old mousepads. Staple one down to a board and presto! Instant lap table. Perfect for weaving in front of the tube, or on long trips.

Joined: May 21, 2004
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Posted on Mon Feb 07, 2005 7:03 pm
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Konstantin the Red wrote:
I never bother with hanging the stuff from a board; I prefer to work on a slightly resilient surface like indoor/outdoor carpet,
*snip*

Lige wrote:

I like to use the neoprene side of old mousepads. Staple one down to a board and presto! Instant lap table. Perfect for weaving in front of the tube, or on long trips.

I personally like the sticky-back foam stuff you can find in 9x11 sheets at Wal-Mart or craft stores. I stick a sheet of black to one side of a piece of cardboard, white to the other side, and I've got a work surface I can use with rings of many colors.

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Posted on Mon Feb 07, 2005 11:16 pm
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i find that useing a sheet of plywood the best so far i get a big serface to work with and i can keep the hole weave nice and tight with a few screws. i have tryed to weace on a flat serface and all i kept doing was getting my weave wrong do to the weave being loose and bunching up.


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Live and learn from it

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