Anvil questions
View previous topic | View next topic >
Post new topic Reply to topic
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Knitting Circle
   
Author Message

Joined: February 02, 2007
Posts: 1084
Submissions: 17
Location: England

Reply with quote
Posted on Sat Jan 05, 2008 11:55 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

i wouldnt have room for an anvil. maybe i coul sell my bed then get an anvil? LOL

Joined: August 01, 2004
Posts: 305
Submissions: 0

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jan 09, 2008 3:06 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

How well would a road sign work. Say I have a stop sign and folded it over a couple of time to make it more compact. Would that be a good surface to flatten rings on?

Joined: February 17, 2005
Posts: 349
Submissions: 19
Location: Fortuna, CA

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jan 09, 2008 3:21 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Me, personally? I use a peice of railroad tie. Weighs about 50 lbs. Heavyu as hell, and stout.

If trains can use it, why can't I?


Maille Code V2.0 T6.7 R5.3 Eo.f Fbyz MAg Whi$ Cew$ G3.25/0.55 I12.7/1.42 W24.29 Pa Dacdejtw Xa2g20p4t0w5 S03

^^^ Dude, this code is so out of date for me now... I don't even remember what it means! ^^^
The unintentional God of Chainmaille,
Brandon Cornwell

Joined: March 12, 2006
Posts: 770
Submissions: 9
Location: Huntington, WV

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jan 09, 2008 3:27 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

good idea, my art teacher has a rail anvil. Get a friend to grind it to an anvil shape and it works just like the real thing

Joined: March 27, 2002
Posts: 3496
Submissions: 1

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:27 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Watcher4187 wrote:
How well would a road sign work? Say I have a stop sign and folded it over a couple of time to make it more compact. Would that be a good surface to flatten rings on?


Nope. You want something hard and it helps if it's heavy. A couple feet of RR track actually works every bit as well as anything more, uh, dignified. Concrete does not work at all if you're beating on mail links.

Road signs are primarily aluminum, and these days tempered pretty hard/stiff (as aluminum goes). They make fine durable shields and simpler armor bits -- aluminum isn't as happy making compound curvatures by hand hammering as steel is, for it fatigues quicker and starts to crack and tear. But steel wire is harder and stiffer yet and you'd simply make all these ring-shaped dents in the aluminum. Use the aluminum sign for something else, and see who's making drops or punch-outs in steel plate 3/8" thick or thicker. If you have to buy it, it's sort of like buying donut holes, but they may let you have it for the hauling it away.

I've run across one fellow on these boards who used a sledgehammer head for his anvil, securing it somehow. He could only do a link at a time, rather than a handful as may be done with larger anvil areas, but it was still pretty fast, if his sledge head was firmly enough braced. I'd set it on some concrete floor, basement or outdoors, in some firm socket such as a framework built up around that hammer head of pieces of wood, surrounding the head in a hole in the center and propping the handle up firmly. This saves you trying to prop it by sitting crosslegged or something with the sledge in your lap -- way too hard.

Roadsign color layers, being plastic, can be lifted with use of a heat gun to cook 'em off, softening the plastic and its adhesive.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: February 16, 2007
Posts: 1430
Submissions: 19
Location: Dayton

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jan 10, 2008 10:45 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

i will say, a chunk of RR track, while thin, will easily get the job done for you. just try to secure it without having to drill through it. (four drill bits later...)

ALSO, if you can get a few lengths and secure them together side-by-side, the underside will give you a nice solid flat surface.


Chaos Est Vita
Scurvy free since '85
It's always night, sometimes it's just brighter than others

<a href="http://mailleartisans.org/articles/articledisplay.cgi?key=55086">Maille Code V2.0 T5.9 R5.1 Eo.f Feur MAg/Ti Wci$ Cbw$ G0.3-14 I1-75 N29.26 Pa/j Dacdjstw Xg16p5t2w1 S07 Hi</a>

Joined: March 27, 2002
Posts: 3496
Submissions: 1

Reply with quote
Posted on Sat Jan 12, 2008 3:44 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

And now, Chaos, I daresay you see the virtues of four to six RR spikes, scrounged in a nice healthy walk along a railroad grade. Works if you're mounting it to a stump or other mighty big block of wood.

If you're located in North America, that is. I've heard Israel and environs, not exactly having wood to burn, use precast concrete ties and a bolt-down sort of method.

Other boltdown method for fixing it to a table or bench: four large U-bolts, tightened down across each corner of the rail foot at 45 degrees, nuts and washers or bar on the underside of the table.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: February 16, 2007
Posts: 1430
Submissions: 19
Location: Dayton

Reply with quote
Posted on Sat Jan 12, 2008 4:33 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

i used deck screws.... Laughing
it's holding up alright so far.


Chaos Est Vita
Scurvy free since '85
It's always night, sometimes it's just brighter than others

<a href="http://mailleartisans.org/articles/articledisplay.cgi?key=55086">Maille Code V2.0 T5.9 R5.1 Eo.f Feur MAg/Ti Wci$ Cbw$ G0.3-14 I1-75 N29.26 Pa/j Dacdjstw Xg16p5t2w1 S07 Hi</a>

Joined: August 01, 2004
Posts: 305
Submissions: 0

Reply with quote
Posted on Sun Mar 02, 2008 2:42 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Well, I found a good hunk of steel. While walking around a railroad I found a 1/2 inch 15 lb piece of steel. It is pretty rusty and needs to be sanded but I think it should work well for flattening links.

Joined: August 01, 2004
Posts: 305
Submissions: 0

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Jul 14, 2008 4:25 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I really hit the jackpot now. The place that I work at was gonig to throw away a 3/8 thick I beam. Needless to sya, I snatched that up as quickly as possible.

Joined: December 25, 2002
Posts: 237
Submissions: 34
Location: St. Albans, VT

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jul 17, 2008 11:06 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

For manufactured anvils in various weights, I recommend NC Tool Company in Pleasant Garden, NC http://www.nctoolco.com/pages/anvils1.htm

David


David Stous
Chief Maille Smith
Wolf's Den Armoury
St. Albans, Vermont
http://www.wolfsdenarmoury.com

Joined: July 22, 2008
Posts: 27
Submissions: 0
Location: naptown In

Reply with quote
Posted on Tue Jul 29, 2008 12:50 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

my two cents.

first, harbor frieght anvils suck. I know, I own them all. from half pound to 110lb.
second, harbor frieght anvils work. dent up the surface pounding on hot steel( or not hot), just regrind the top mm.
third, most knife making doesnt require as much forging as one might think. sure if you start with a 3 pound billet/block and forge a samurai sword, it might take a month. but most humans start with flatter stock, and the forging would be just working the shape a little, or compacting the blade portion.
forth, grinding will do more to change the shape, and to smooth the final piece( you will have forge marks). I recommend getting a crappy anvil, and several great sets of quality tongs( cost as much as my largest anvil each), and a sweet knife belt sander( the kind that sound like a plane engine when you turn them on). these are much more important in getting a finished blade than the quality of the anvil.
fifth, and I dont know why you would want to know this, but meteorites were used for hundreds, if not thousands of years by humans as anvils. Although this steel is about the densest iron on planet earth(natural), there was never a polished surface, or a hardened steel plate welded to a soft body, and somehow humans made some sweet knives with it. course they were also using chunks of the meteorite as iron to forge knives from, which is never a bad thing.

ring flattening....can be done anywhere. vises sometimes have small anvils attached to them(its the flat spot on the back), much cheaper than an anvil.

sixth, I would looooovvvve to have a 300lb ferriers anvil, made in england or america. anyone got 700$ I can borrow?

seventh, I would loooovvve to have a 300 pound meteorite to beat on. anyone got 70000$ I can bum?

8th.....youll need to grind the marks off of the hammer. many 2-5 lb hammers have a grooved ring pattern on the face, I have no idea why.

so thats my 8 cents, 6 more than I should have given....

look forward to seeing the fruit of your forging labor...

Post new topic Reply to topic
Jump to:  
Page 2 of 2. Goto page Previous  1, 2
All times are GMT. The time now is Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:15 pm
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Knitting Circle
Display posts from previous: