ARG!! I mixed my Galvy and stainless!!!
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ARG!! I mixed my Galvy and stainless!!!
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Posted on Sun Nov 12, 2006 7:52 pm
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Okay, First....ARG!!! I was cleaning my working area and somehow got my galvy and stainless mixed up, then mixed together!! (needs a better label plan than "oh, thats here and thats here") Does anyone know of a fast and easy way to separate galvy rings from stainless rings???


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Posted on Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:02 pm
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Use a magnet. SS is not magnetic, and galvy is.


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Posted on Mon Nov 13, 2006 1:13 am
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Uhh stainless is magnetic, but not as strong as galvy. So the galvy should stick to the magnet more readily.

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Posted on Mon Nov 13, 2006 3:25 am
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find the density of a stainless and a gavly ring. and sort them out that way, errrrr, all you need to do is find the density for each and every ring.

hope you dont have too many rings, it may take a while.


no, but really. if you have the right lighting you may be able to see the difference, to me new stainless looks oily and new galvy looks dull and rough ...thats how i fix it when my mother cleans up my desk.

good luck--alden--

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Posted on Mon Nov 13, 2006 12:19 pm
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Demosthenes wrote:
Uhh stainless is magnetic, but not as strong as galvy. So the galvy should stick to the magnet more readily.


Depends on the alloy. If you mean 300 series stainless (as TRL sells), it is effectively dimagnetic. Takes quite a magnet to get an appreciable attraction.

Magnet is your best bet, or just go by luster. Stainless tends to be much shinier

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Posted on Mon Nov 13, 2006 7:21 pm
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Quote:
Depends on the alloy. If you mean 300 series stainless (as TRL sells), it is effectively dimagnetic. Takes quite a magnet to get an appreciable attraction.

Yeah that is precisely the alloy I meant, and I was using 30 1/2" rare earth magnets Razz But considering all substances are technically dimagnetic and my flesh isn't sticking to the magnet, I would consider stainless magnetic in laymans terms.

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Posted on Tue Nov 14, 2006 4:31 am
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You could keep the rings in water for a few days, allowing the galvy to get a white-ish coating and then seperate them. Or if you keep them in your pockets for around two weeks the galvy should also ge the coating(wash and all, I accidentally did it once).


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Posted on Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:43 pm
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Demosthenes wrote:
Yeah that is precisely the alloy I meant, and I was using 30 1/2" rare earth magnets Razz But considering all substances are technically dimagnetic and my flesh isn't sticking to the magnet, I would consider stainless magnetic in laymans terms.

OK, one of us is confused, so I'll add some definitions.
Magnetic - has a mag field. Only magnets are magnetic. A plain chunk of iron is not.
Ferromagnetic - a substance which is attracted by a magnet. A plain chunk of iron is.
Dimagnetic - a substance which is not attracted by a magnet, such as wood.
TRL sells mostly 300 series, which is effectively dimagnetic. Takes a mighty strong mag field. Some TRL stainless (notably 21 gauge) is 400 series, which is ferromagnetic.
With a pair of 300 series permabracelets, I can assure you most magnets won't attract them.

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Posted on Tue Nov 14, 2006 9:11 pm
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Okie Dokie, Stainless is not diamagnetic. It is paramagnetic. Meaning it becomes magnetic in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field (albeit a very strong one) but does not retain any magnetism when the field is removed. (As opposed to a ferromagnetic substance which can retain magnetism when the field is removed)
Diamagnetism is a property that all substances have. It does have a reaction when placed in a magnetic field, just not one that a non physicist would consider magnetic(aka being attracted to magnet) This link will explain it better than I can, and it also has links to videos of frogs being levitated in magnetic fileds! Razz
To simplify it, when I placed my magnets near my stainless (304 series) it was attracted to the magnet. If an 8 year old were to see this (or a layman) he/she would say that the stainless is magnetic. Yes it took a very strong magnet (though not even close to the strength of some electromagnets) to do so but they don't nessacarily know that.
Back on topic Razz If you use a moderately strong magnet (not rare earth magnets like me Razz ) you should be able to seperate your galvy from your stainless assuming it is a 300 series alloy.(whew that was fun, I love debating!)

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Posted on Wed Nov 15, 2006 1:36 pm
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Ah, sorry. I missed the part where you said you used rare earth magnets. They have the "mighty strong mag field" that I said would be necessary to attract 300 series stainless.

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Posted on Wed Nov 15, 2006 2:28 pm
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Welllll, if you don't care about your galvy rings, then soak them all in Lemon Juice and/or Peroxide for 15 minutes or so, and all the glavy rings will be a gray/black.

It's the quickest way, but you might not want your galvy rings afterward...*shrug*


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Posted on Wed Nov 15, 2006 3:22 pm
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Hehe.. aye, cull the weak galvy!


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Posted on Wed Nov 15, 2006 10:36 pm
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I nearly shuddered at that post of definitions. Let's try again:

Ferromagnetic - has a HIGH magnetic susceptibility and is attracted by magnets, e.g. iron.

Paramagnetic - like ferro, it is attracted, but it has LOW magnetic susceptibility (weakly attracted).

Diamagnetic - low susceptibility, but repulsed by magnets. A good example is water, which is why most organic stuff is diamagnetic. If you put a rare-earth magnet near a grape on a string, or something, it will be pushed away.

There isn't a fine line between the first two (that I know of, feel free to correct me). What it comes down to is a number represented with a letter Mu. It stands for magnetic susceptibility, which is how well the particles and their electrons line up their spins / poles to point in the same or opposite direction as the surrounding field. If this number is high, the poles line up well and create a complimentary field that attracts or repulses the original field. If they don't line up well, it either 1. has seemingly no effect, or 2. takes a really really strong magnet to force the substance to line up until an effect is noticeable.

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Posted on Wed Nov 15, 2006 11:55 pm
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Tesserex wins! Sorta, the line he was missing between Paramagnetism and ferromagnetism is (and I quote directly from the definition of paramagnetism)
Quote:
"Paramagnetic materials are attracted to magnetic fields, hence have a relative magnetic permeability greater than unity (or, equivalently, a positive magnetic susceptibility). However, unlike ferromagnets which are also attracted to magnetic fields, paramagnets do not retain any magnetisation in the absence of an externally applied magnetic field."
Of course this is a very fine line. (Variables such as temperature can affect the magnetic susceptibility of materials)
To sum it up
Mild Steel or galvy, primarily ferrite iron. High magnetic susceptibility, ferrromagnetic, sticks to magnets quite readily and can retain magnetism when applied magnetic field is removed
Stainless Steel 300 series or austenitic chromium-nickel alloys, made of primarily austentite iron. Low magnetic susceptibility, paramagnetic, takes a strong magnetic field to attract and does not retain magnetism when applied field is removed
Water, made of primarily water Razz Negative magnetic susceptibility, diamagnetic, is repulsed by magnets (VERY strong magnets because the diamagnetic effect is very weak) Once again I point you to here because it is freaking cool!

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Posted on Thu Nov 16, 2006 4:01 am
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I can't believe nobody even tried to suggest smelling them. I've never worked with stainless rings, but lay them out ( all of them ) somewhere like a basement and leave for a few days. then you shoulde just be able to tell from color. mabye stainless and galvy react differently on your teeth, like galvy rings make my fillings feel like licking a battery.


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