saw cutting?
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Joined: January 03, 2006
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saw cutting?
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Posted on Wed Aug 16, 2006 4:42 am
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hey guys

i ordered a saw from TRL and i know that i need to use some bees wax but how offten do you need to wax the blade? every ring, few rings, stroke?

thanks guys
-matt


Matt Athayde

By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe.

Joined: April 14, 2006
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Location: Born and raised in MI, now in CT

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Posted on Wed Aug 16, 2006 7:09 am
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Beeswax isn't really needed...it's just very useful. While I would definitely suggest using it to lubricate the blade and make everything go a lot smoother, there's no set interval you need to apply the wax. Generally, just go with your instincts...if you feel the blade start to get stuck or if you think it should be moving smoother than it is, go ahead and put some on. On the other hand, if you have a good rhythm going, don't interupt it just to put beeswax on the saw.

Also, a few general tips for sawing: Rhythm is key--a slow, steady rhythm with long strokes will cut much faster than fast, frantic movements. Keep in mind that the blade only cuts on the down stroke, so the longer that stroke is, the more you will cut at once. Practice makes perfect, don't be surprised if you break a ton of sawblades when starting out. Depending on your set up and how long your coils are, you might want to put a piece of tape to hold the coil together while you're sawing.

Enjoy your pretty, flush cuts. Coif Smiley


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Posted on Wed Aug 16, 2006 1:55 pm
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what is a good way to hold the coil, i saw some one talking about a c shaped piece almost that bends the coil then collects the cut rings, i also was thinking about getting a dowle rod and cuting a slit in it so my blade could go into it and cut into the metal only.

thanks

-matt


Matt Athayde

By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe.

Joined: April 14, 2006
Posts: 143
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Location: Born and raised in MI, now in CT

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Posted on Wed Aug 16, 2006 2:35 pm
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I've never used either of those methods but I'm sure they would work just fine. I usually do really small-scale jewelry stuff so I just make smaller coils and hold them in my hand up against a bench pin. It's really up to you and it all depends on what type of stuff you're doing. I'd suggest trying a few different methods and then choose which works best for you.


"You're out of your mind."
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Posted on Wed Aug 16, 2006 2:40 pm
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ok, thank you very much

im going to be working with some 16 ga 1/4'' id bright AL mostly just to try saw cutting and for some nice rings for personal stuff and gifts to family (i normaly use pre-cut rings from TRL and will keep with that for other stuff probably)

thanks
-matt


Matt Athayde

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Posted on Wed Aug 16, 2006 7:58 pm
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It's often easier for beginners to cut on the mandrel, and a curved mandrel is easiest, but you can wrap your coil in masking tape and cut it on the bench as well. Beeswax is good, but also plain old candle wax will lubricate your blade. I keep a bunch of tea-lights in my studio - they have the little store them in when you're done - fewer wax crumblies in my workspace, and if you're really into it, aromatherapy ones release a nice fragrance while you work Coif Smiley The main goal in lubricating sawblades, drill bits, and burrs is to prevent friction heat, because friction heat cuts WAY down on the life of your blades and bits.

And remember, when it comes to sawing, slow and steady wins the race.


--kiki b.

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It was lookin' at me funny.

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Posted on Wed Aug 16, 2006 9:30 pm
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well i have bees wax already so its not liek im spending any more money, i guess ill just play around with methods when i get my stuff, thanks for the tips.

-matt


Matt Athayde

By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe.

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