making galvanized turn black
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Posted on Wed Mar 03, 2004 5:09 am
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no no no...i didn;t heat my piece. i just dipped it to keep it shiny.

when you heat the piece, it is the iron oxide that is black, not the oil you quench it in. plus motor oil will burst into flame at 3000 degrees i'm fairly sure of.


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Posted on Wed Mar 03, 2004 2:05 pm
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Well, the machined pieces weren't heated to a cherry red. But indeed, often when the dipped piece was lifted from the can of oil, the oil still coating the piece would burst into flame; it would certainly always start smoking a bit. He would then dip the piece again which would extinguish the flames, then repeat this dipping and lifting process a couple of times.


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Leo "14thWarrior" M. Lalande

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Posted on Thu Mar 04, 2004 5:39 am
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you'll have to explain a lot more...i don't get what you use and how you do that... Confused


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Posted on Thu Mar 04, 2004 3:14 pm
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Not sure what else can se said... Get a bucket of used motor oil. Heat your metal piece with a heat source (probably to around 600 degrees or a bit more, not so hot that it becomes red). Quench in used motor oil. Remove the piece from the oil, to let drip off, and to let the oil burn onto or cook onto the piece. Quench and remove the piece again to thicken the coating. Repeat 2 or 3 more times provided the piece has retained enough heat to continue to burn the oil onto itself.

Ideally, the piece will be hot enough to bring the oil to the smoking point.

(Please keep in mind that it's been over 17 years since my last high school machine shop class, and we were never allowed to actually do this process ourselves, only the teacher could do it; so I can't be absolutely certain about the temeratures and such. Very Happy)


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Leo "14thWarrior" M. Lalande

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Posted on Fri Mar 05, 2004 3:03 am
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14th Warrior, I think you are onto what I was asking about. I apologize to everyone for not specifying my material, I am working with mild steel riveted mail. Ever seen a brand new cast iron skillet? Kind of grayish, clean metal. Compare it to a really old one. Old ones are black, or seasoned. People will pay more for a sesoned cast iron skillet than they will pay for a new one. I season an iron skillet by heating it with animal fat, eventually turning it black. The black coating is very durable. Case hardening still results in steel colored mail, where seasoning turns it black. Any type of oil should work. I appreciate Mr. Erik Schmid's comment about there being no evidence that historic mail was ever case hardened. I was curious of the historical signifigance of this type of treatment.

~Erik

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Posted on Fri Mar 05, 2004 5:49 am
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the problem with that is just like the problems with cast iron skillets. If you touch it with a drop of soap, you ruin all the seasoning in that area. So as soon as you want to wash your mail from grime and dust, you can't unless you want to re-season it all.


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Posted on Fri Mar 05, 2004 6:07 am
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Actually, the cooked on oil coat of a seasoned cast iron pan is quite tough. Heck even just spray PAM or some other non-stick spray on a baking sheet and let it bake on, then try to scrub it off... you'll be amazed how much scrubbing you have to do. I imagine the same would be true of oil blackened maille. Naturally the movement of the maille might eventually cause it to wear off; but it would likely take a while.

I'll be able to test this technique I'm suggesting later this spring, once the father in law reopens his cottage. Smile A campfire will likely be perfect for heating up a swatch of maille. Smile


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Leo "14thWarrior" M. Lalande

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Posted on Fri Mar 05, 2004 6:22 am
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uh huh... or you can shove it in the oven...WHOAH!! IDEA!! Surprised


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Posted on Fri Mar 05, 2004 2:11 pm
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Yes, I could shove it in the oven.... but then I risk smoking up the whole apartment, and causing unknown harm to my unborn child, and my wife, and I.

No, I think I prefer to do this in the great outdoors, where the ventilation is good. Very Happy


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Leo "14thWarrior" M. Lalande

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Posted on Fri Mar 05, 2004 3:47 pm
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My skin seems to turn glavy black.... wonder what that means lol Coif LoL


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Posted on Sun Mar 07, 2004 1:23 am
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you might be able to do this in a barbeque oven thing. just use wood instead of coals.


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Posted on Sun Mar 07, 2004 1:24 am
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btw, wouldn't heating the steel and ...o wait you are quenching it. nevermind


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Posted on Wed Mar 31, 2004 11:38 am
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Dont trust a bird to tell you when its safe, birds were used in mines to alert miners of a biuld up of carbon monoxide gas and methane and other gases I belive. Both gases displace the oxygen in the blood, making the more vulnerable bird pass out (sometimes die). You are dealing with a zinc oxide chemical, before you start heating things on the stove please know what the effects are. Anyone seen a Materia saftey data sheet for galvy/zinc that would be relevant? I will look around for a while.
Emailed OSHA


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Posted on Wed Mar 31, 2004 5:13 pm
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AnglianFry wrote:
Anyone seen a Materia saftey data sheet for galvy/zinc that would be relevant? I will look around for a while.
Emailed OSHA


As a matter of fact, yes.
http://www.mailleartisans.org/board/viewtopic.php?t=2831

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Posted on Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:43 pm
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I had some Casey gun blueing in the shop. So I dipped some galvy into it. It turned black in about 2 sec. I had a few grey rings, but they were on top and didn't get fully immersed.

hope it helps.
Stephen

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