making galvanized turn black
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Joined: March 26, 2002
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Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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I saw Thexnihils article on coloring wire and was wondering how long to leave it in.

I tried vinegar once and had trouble getting the time right. I got some good black, but I also got some rusted links where it ate right though the zinc and oxidized the steel.

Any advice? Confused



(accidental alliteration)

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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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h202 is hydrogen perioxide, it works well, but i find that it works quicker than the lemon juice, so it can be harder to keep track of timing. also, it causes some pre-oxidzation to happen, on account of the oxygen in the H2O2.



There are only 2 things in life that we can be assured of: Somethings will never stop changing, and some things will never change.

Joined: November 05, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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I haven't been able to get the rings black with peroxide at all, and in lemon juice it just falls off. So what I do is just put some rings on my stove, turn on the fan, open the window, and keep away for a few minutes, then hold my breath and take them off and cool them in some water. Works great.

Joined: September 24, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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Just a thought about the use of vinegar, or lemon juice as a reactant to get a good black color. It's a chemical reaction taking place, so as it goes on, the acids in these liquids are neutralized. In other words, after long enough, the solution isn't acidic anymore, so you're not going to get any corrosion. A thought for getting a nice consistent color might be to use multiple baths of lower concentrations. You wouldn't have to worry about the time so much, because you'd end up with the same neutralization.

Sorry about the edit, I can't type.

[ This Message was edited by: Darken on 2002-11-14 18:00 ]

Joined: November 17, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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At a hardware store near me, they sell black galvy. *shrug*



If it weren't for maille, I would do legos every day.

-Me

To boldly weave what no one has woven before. . .

Joined: August 19, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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I use a sort of steel called tie wire for black rings. I have a length of fp made out of it for a keychain, and it polishes up quite well, by constantly being used. I tried the lemon juice thing too, and I did not like the results, just darker smudged look after 1/2 an hour.

Joined: June 02, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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i used tie wire when i first started weaving, it is basically just mild steel with a machine grease coating. this stuff does shine up a nice glossy black, but rusts way to easy for my liking..



There are only 2 things in life that we can be assured of: Somethings will never stop changing, and some things will never change.

Joined: November 18, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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How 'bout cold Black Oxide. It's a tool dip that supposedly has the same effect as the hot black oxide dip. Turns steel black. Anyone ever tried it on maille?

Joined: September 24, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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I'd never even heard of it. Any idea where to find some? If it's reasonably cheap and effective, I'd love to pick some up.

Joined: November 18, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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Cheap? It seems to be. $25 per half-gallon, and it's reusable.

Effective? No idea. I also don't know if you'd have to strip galvy first to remove the zinc, or if it would work right over it.

Here's the link (maybe), http://www.caswellplating.com

Look under Plating Kits for Black Oxide Kit.




[ This Message was edited by: Owen on 2002-11-18 15:50 ]

[ This Message was edited by: Owen on 2002-11-18 15:50 ]

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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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Sounds like a decent deal to me .. I guess the effectiveness depends on whether or not it's based on an actual chemical reaction, or if it's just an epoxy type resin coating. (Which, now that I think about it, is used pretty commonly on pipeline, so it sticks to steel quite well, and is available in a multitude of colors.. I don't know if it's commercially available though; or just industrial.)

Joined: November 18, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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Hi folks. It turns out that there is a zinc blackener product (same site) for $30 for 2 gallons.

Should do a nice job on galvy directly. I wonder what happens to the cut ends?

Tempting, tempting...

Joined: December 25, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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Personally, I've found that a 3% solution of Hydrogen Peroxide (the stuff at Drugstores/groceries in the brown plastic bottle) seems to work fine...only takes about fifteen or so minutes. My wife found out by accident when she was trying to find out what we had around the house to clean some pieces before a Craft show.

By the way, plain old Crest toothpaste works pretty good for cleaning. Smile



David Stous
Chief Maille Smith
Wolf's Den Armoury
St. Albans, Vermont
http://www.wolfsdenarmoury.com

Joined: March 05, 2003
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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Now this is a completely diffreent aproach but it does work very well. On both mild steel and high carbon steel. I use it as a finish on alot of the blacksmith work I do. Take the piece of steel once it has been woven. Build a fire let it burn down to the coals and set the chainmail in the coals and cover it up. Now you have two choices wait just a minute or two to let the mail warm up then dip it in olive oil to get a nice matte black finish, or in the case of armor leave the piece in the fire till its a cherry red (as seen in the shade probably better to do this at night) then remove it and put it into a tub of olive oil stirring the mail object around until the oil stops bubbling. The second option will also harden the rings very useful if your making armor or just want a somewhat more durable piece.

hope this helped,
Black Spot Juan
(its a long story)

Joined: November 05, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jan 01, 2000 5:00 am
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Thanks!
Does it also keep it from rusting? How durable is it for decently used maille?



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