Euro 6-in-1, how to change weave 90 degrees?
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Joined: October 20, 2018
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Location: Darwin, NT, Australia

Euro 6-in-1, how to change weave 90 degrees?
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Posted on Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:51 pm
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So this is my conundrum. I’m making a hauberk and I’ve essentially made a tabard which I’ll close the sides in to make a vest.
The sleeves which I want to craft, I want to turn them 90 degrees at the shoulder so the entire length of the arm hangs closed. My difficulty is in drastically changing the orientation of the rings, yet still connecting in a way that enables mobility and strength.

Has anyone achieved this before, or does everyone just continue the weave as is, so the that rings on the sleeve all hang ‘open’?

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Posted on Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:26 pm
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The '4 trapezoid' shoulder will give a 'closed' sleeve but it sets at about 75 degrees which most people find uncomfortable and exhausting. There is also no evidence that it was ever used historically, so the authenticity police will object. Attempts to modify it to give a 90 degree set have had very limited success and are lumpy and ugly.


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Posted on Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:36 pm
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Bermuda, welcome and well come to MAIL.

A knee-length hauberk in 6-1? Yikes: between half again the number of links plus a steeper link-lie, in butted links you are probably looking at upwards of 30 kilos of mail sitting on you. Expect twice the weight of 4-1. Less elasticity along the resilient dimension too.

I'd insist on E4-1 overall, instead of 6-1 in nearly any large armour piece, from byrnie-sized on upwards. One *can* find a few ancient, historical 6-1 pieces; all the ones I've heard of were mail collars, called "standards of mail" in armour parlance. Strong, if heavier -- not terribly at sizes like these -- and applied to particularly vital and vulnerable body parts, and primarily for soldiers lightly and simply armoured -- foot soldiers with polearms.

Possibly historically accurate, yet only poorly attested as of yet, is the mantle-top shirt construction. Its shoulders are exactly like the shoulder part of a coif of mail and closed-hang (and preferably short, as it is messy to put an elbow-pocket into sleeves of this link-hang) sleeves. See Library --> Articles --> "Hauberks for First-Timers, Second-Timers, and Third" for how-to on building a mantletop shirt, here on this site.

http://www.mailleartisans.org/articles/articledisplay.php?key=203 Hmm; I've learned a *lot* about tailoring mailshirt body barrels since I wrote this that long ago. Half of what I wrote in there I wouldn't say now! But the mantletop method still holds up; I seem to have gotten that one right. I made one fundamental mistake on the Trevor Barker mailshirt tute I mention there: a triangular expansion array is an isosceles triangle, of nearly any degree of obtusity/acuteness of the apex, and not a right triangle at all.

Open-hang sleeves are the lion's share of mail shirts and modular mail sleeves. The open hang cooperates better with the flexure of a hinge joint like an elbow -- or knuckles. The easiest, neatest way to fit an elbow pocket into the sleeve, which is required if you want to maintain circulation to your forearm and hand with your arm bent, is into open-hang sleeves, making the columnar-direction expansion and contraction -- these are the same thing, just pointed in different directions. A sleeve so done, if held up and let hang, has a bit of a bend and looks a lot like holding up a sock with a heel in it -- same bulge, same angle of bend. Accomodates what your elbow actually hinges to do, namely flex a lot more forward than ever it does backward. The mail needs its extra slack right there. Then, down the forearm, a whole-row taper, or contraction, is called for to tuck the sleeve's end in close so it doesn't flop around vexingly, and also takes some weight off it right there, where lightness is needed, at the end of the limb. Without taking this measure, your hauberk slows down your sword. It's like trying to sprint in galoshes.

Serious strength in mail, like twelve to fifteen times the strength of the stoutest butted link in the same link inner diameter, is conferred by riveting links shut, welding them sometimes, and punching them from sheet as "spacer rings," made by washer manufacturers. All that at five eighths the weight overall, too. And at a small capital investment in tools for riveted links too. Apart from a hibachi to anneal links in, the whole tool kit fits into about half a toolbox tray.

In that article I recommend that a shirt's basic body barrel be made not vertically up and over, folding over you like a tabard or a serape, but instead to wrap around you horizontally, to avoid a couple of annoyances trying to match linkrows up neatly.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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