Modifying Cutters for Overlap
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Joined: February 24, 2017
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Location: TX

Modifying Cutters for Overlap
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Posted on Thu Mar 30, 2017 9:56 pm
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Hello again!

I've seen lots of videos with modified cutters and such to cut overlapping rings, and I would like to make a pair.

Everything I've found simply suggests modifying them, and I'm having trouble actually making the hole in the cutters for the overlap.

Any suggestions for doing this?

Joined: February 24, 2017
Posts: 15
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Location: TX

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Posted on Thu Mar 30, 2017 10:30 pm
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Alrighty, I finally found a guide on this site for doing this. Will try to follow the guide and see if it works for me. Smile

But all suggestions are welcome!

Joined: March 27, 2002
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Posted on Fri Mar 31, 2017 4:37 am
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I generally suggest not bothering, since if you then proceed to rivet, you'll flatten the overlap anyway, with a hammer. If you are making Japanese links of two complete turns, that's another matter and none of the following applies.

With overlapped link ends sitting so: 8, you have a terrible problem with flattening the overlaps and keeping the one end atop the other. If you strike the least little bit off, the upper end falls off the lower end.

I found success by this overlap & flatten technique: 1) cut link from coil; 2) hammer link ends mostly flat; 3) *then* overlap the ends, using pliers and a smaller-diameter mandrel for consistency and to have something to work on; 4) final-flatten the link ends to finish the flattening and ready the link for piercing for a rivet.

No more slipping off, and little misflattening once I controlled how fast and hard I hit the link overlaps with the heavy hammer.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: February 24, 2017
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Posted on Fri Mar 31, 2017 2:58 pm
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I'll give that a try and let you know how it goes Smile

Joined: February 24, 2017
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Posted on Fri Mar 31, 2017 7:46 pm
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Yeah, the method you described works much better. I also had success with flattening the entire ring then using hammer taps to reshape the ring into a nice overlap. It wasn't difficult, just had to pay attention. Ring came out great.

Another question - For rivets, is it okay to flatten both sides, or should one side always have the little half-sphere? I have the pliers for it, but I was just curious. For now, I'm drilling the holes with a 1/16 bit and using 16 gauge wire for the rivets. Once the masonry nails get here, I'm going to try drifting the holes and using wedge rivets. I'm guessing that with wedge rivets it's necessary to use the riveting pliers.

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Posted on Sat Apr 01, 2017 4:35 pm
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It's kinda-sorta okay, but there seems to be a technical matter here: you have so little metal to work with in the first place to make a good rivet joint that you're well advised to both conserve metal (mostly, drifting the hole open) and to put the teensy quantity of metal you do have into the optimal place. So shaping the rivet-head that you make when you upset it -- called the "shop head" in the trade, since the rivets come with the one head from the factory and your shop bangs the other rivet head onto the rivet to clinch the joint -- into at least a bit of a hump seems to put your scarce metal into the best spot for strength, for you want that rivet join to be as strong as you can arrange it.

I'm a little surprised at "once the masonry nails get here" -- just haven't gotten to the hardware store yet...? Or is there a hardware store and that's the problem? Anyway, sounds pretty funny to me. You do live in Texas.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: February 24, 2017
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Posted on Sat Apr 01, 2017 6:50 pm
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The hardware store I like doesn't carry masonry nails, and I really don't like going to home depot / Lowe's, places like that. So I just ordered them online Smile

And good to know about the rivets. Thanks!

Joined: March 27, 2002
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Posted on Sat Apr 08, 2017 1:12 am
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Hmm... I'm not especially antisocial, so I don't avoid the vast expanses of Lowe's on any particular principle. Only on mood, if that.

Builders' supply outfits can be good for fasteners of all types, since their clientele use fasteners of all types. Their stores are also not vasty acreages.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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