Request- Different time periods and styles of rings
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Joined: April 18, 2013
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Location: Portsmouth Va

Request- Different time periods and styles of rings
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Posted on Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:30 am
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I was wondering if anyone more knowledgable than I would be willing to create a cheat sheet, so to speak of different weaves, ring sizes and styles etc based on civilization and time period.

I know theres a wide variety in each civilization and period but I was thinking of the most common ones.

If no one has the info or data I can do some research and collect it. I just was wondering if anyone here already has it all.


Metal is all around us. We take it from the ground. We bend it, mold it, break it. We make it useful and beautiful.

Joined: May 18, 2014
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Posted on Wed Jan 11, 2017 3:23 pm
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So far as I am aware, for most of the maille-wearing world, across most of maille-wearing history, the weave we refer to as 'European 4-in-1' has been overwhelmingly dominant with only minor variations (mixing in 'theta rings', mixing in solid rings, butted rings, various styles of riveted rings, 'plated maille', etc).

One thing that seems to have been quite popular 'back in the day', but less common in modern reproductions is graduated maille (variations of gauge and diameter across different portions of the same piece of maille). Or, this might just be a figment of personal over-exposure to lower quality reproductions. I don't know.

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Posted on Thu Jan 12, 2017 4:33 am
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Graduated link sizes are more encountered in Near Eastern and Indian mail.

For Europe, as said, it's E4-1, and as a rare variant, E6-1 in small, and specialized armour pieces: mail standards/collars for the very vital neck.

The other weaves are all modern, jewelry-aligned sorts of things. As war gear, Euro mail was as functional as parkerizing -- and about as commonly found, in militaries and war zones.

Maybe you're getting the wide-variety idea thinking of Japan, where the mail links were so seldom riveted closed and might well be links of multiple turns mixed with simpler links in as many assorted patterns as the Japanese imagination found actually useful. Native Japanese mail-bits generally seemed used more to connect other hard bits together into a single armor component, as in Japanese sleeves -- not as purely the only armor; their taste didn't seem to run that way, though see below. An exception was hidden J4-1, which is pretty much E4-1 turned sideways and hung in open hang, discreetly lining Japanese upper garments, which fastened closed in the traditional wraparound Japanese manner, like the top of a judo gi. Armor that doesn't look like armor, surprise! gotcha! Compare this to Middle Eastern Jazerant.

The Japanese were very intrigued when in the early sixteenth century European riveted mail shirts appeared with Portuguese traders from the West. The Japanese found it so distinctive they dubbed it "namban-gusari," or "southern barbarian chain," and quite liked the stuff as an exotic import.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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