To jig or not to jig
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Joined: May 10, 2014
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To jig or not to jig
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Posted on Sat May 10, 2014 3:13 pm
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Hi, I'm fairly new to the craft. I'm currently working on a euro 6 in 1 with 14 gauge galvsteel. As of now I'm making my rings by hand, using a copper pipe. Would it be worth it to invest in a jig to help with the proccess or is the benefit not worth the investment?

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Posted on Sat May 10, 2014 4:58 pm
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I'm also fairly new, but I'd say you should definitely buy a couple of different sized mandrels to coil your wire on, also a drill or screwdriver is very efficient when coiling too.

I don't have a jig myself, but I just use a mandrel and a drill in my lap and it works great so far, no problems or inconvenience.

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Posted on Sat May 10, 2014 5:26 pm
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Thanks for the reply.
That's kindof what I was thinking, I can coil up my wire fairly quickly using my jury rigged mandrel, if awkwardly. However, in the future I will want to make different diameter projects than the one I'm doing right now which means buying a jig or expanding my collection of copper pipes.

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Posted on Sat May 10, 2014 10:14 pm
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Give this thread a read for some helpful tips on winding your own coils.


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Posted on Sat May 10, 2014 10:22 pm
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I use mild steel rod for larger sizes, tool steel for smaller sizes.
Most supplies will have 3/16-1" in 1/8" increments.
McMaster, enco, fastenel, and other shops have tool steel in 1/128" increments and metric.
For hand coiling I use a pair of vice grips as a crank handle.
Steel is a lot cheaper then copper.

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Re: To jig or not to jig
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Posted on Sun May 11, 2014 4:46 am
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BLINDBARD wrote:
As of now I'm making my rings by hand, using a copper pipe. Would it be worth it to invest in a jig to help with the proccess or is the benefit not worth the investment?


YES.

If you already own a power drill of any type -- even a drill press can work with just a bit of imagination and a wooden feeding block -- you've already got the hard and expensive part out of the way, and need only go get mandrel rods, any size you can fit in the drill, plus a few bits and bobs.

If you use a screwdriver's shaft, use a phillips-head or other driver that doesn't splay out at the end into a broader blade.

A hand-cranked jig is quite safe -- power-winding your wire can get you pretty beat up if you wrap yourself up in your work, and that happens too suddenly to react. But powerwinding is speedy. Obey the GROPP -- you can look the acronym up onsite.

See all the pictures of winding rigs and feedblocks in the Library: Gallery: Tools section.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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Posted on Sun May 11, 2014 7:01 am
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when i hand wind thicker wire i just brace the rod on the spool the wire came on. idk if you even have a spool though they are useful for that if you are ever weighing the pros and cons of spool vs loose.

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Posted on Sun May 11, 2014 11:54 am
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Awesome, thanks for the tips guys.
Seeing as I don't have a drill or the like at the moment, I think I'm going to go with the method I use for now, and save up for a drill and some real mandrels.[/url]

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Posted on Tue May 13, 2014 6:09 am
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If you are active duty and live in barracks, that should be about the fifteenth of the month!

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Posted on Thu May 15, 2014 1:01 pm
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Harbor Freight has a set of center punches that work out great for making shorter (4") coils. Have not miked them out as to whether they are all that true but for rings that don't have to be dead on they work.

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Posted on Thu May 15, 2014 3:39 pm
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Haha, it is about the 15th, but I have a wife and kids to feed too.
And I'll have to check out harbor freight, I like buying tools and such from them.

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Posted on Fri May 16, 2014 4:19 am
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I think Reenie means drift pins, not center punches, but yeah. They come in widths. The idea is to match the drift to the pin you're trying to knock out of the machine.

Steel rod stock is still less than five bucks for three or four feet, even in the hardware store. Rod stock is far cheaper than that bought from a steel store, and they cut it to length too. It is, however, hotrolled and softer and very prone to rust if you don't do something thorough to keep rust off.

I hope you're not having to entirely feed that family on less than E-5 pay and allowances.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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Posted on Fri May 16, 2014 2:51 pm
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Actually, what both Renee and Konstantin are referring to is Harbor Freight's transfer punch set. 28 piece set for $9.99; normally used for transferring the location of a hole in a piece of metal or pattern onto another piece of metal. They're straight "rods" with a point on one end. Find the one that corresponds with the diameter of the hole in your pattern piece, insert it in the hole and it will locate the center of that hole for you onto your work.

Since most sets are laid out in 16th-inch increments, they work quite well as mandrels up to the capacity of your drill chuck. They go up to half inch usually, and start at something around 1/16-inch. Then all that's left is springback of the material you're winding. With any luck, the kerf of your saw cut will compensate enough for that.


All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

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Posted on Sat May 17, 2014 12:04 am
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It's E4 pay unfortunately, and I actually just got some harbor freight coupons in the mail, so I'll have to look for this set.

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Posted on Sat May 17, 2014 1:17 am
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http://www.harborfreight.com/28-piece-transfer-punch-set-3577.html

There you go. It's 3/32" to 1/2" by 64ths, and includes a 17/32" as well.

Only problem is, most variable speed hand drills only have a 3/8" chuck, although they DO have this one on sale right now:

http://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-variable-speed-reversible-heavy-duty-d-handle-drill-69453.html

And as for E4 pay, I know you have a family and probably don't have base housing, but console yourself that at least it's more than I made when I was an E4 back in 1969 - 70. I was in the USAF and made E4 in under 2 years and E5 under 3. I remember when I first made E5 the pay was $383/month.


All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

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