Shirts, shirts, shirts shirts shirts shirts! ERREHBODEH!
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Posted on Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:26 am
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Konstantin the Red wrote:
-- though I have never heard of a genuine historical bishop's-mantle being assembled of joined-up trapezoids.


Chicago's Art Institute has one that's composed of 2 trapezoids plus some funny neck expansions. The online photo shows it being worn with the points front to back but I had a chance to try it on before it was donated and it was way more comfortable with the points worn side to side over the shoulders.

http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/116847?search_no=6&index=56


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Posted on Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:05 am
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Was it, like, boat necked?

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Posted on Tue Jul 02, 2013 12:59 pm
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don't know. I'm not familiar with the term 'boat necked'.


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Posted on Sun Jul 07, 2013 7:07 pm
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A neckline that looks like a sketch of a canoe. Or like someone slit the end of a pillowcase and put their head through the hole.


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Posted on Tue Jul 09, 2013 1:45 am
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And then added 2 triangular bits at the ends of the slit to make it more of a real rectangle. That sounds about right.


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Posted on Thu Jul 18, 2013 9:27 am
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Do you have any pics to the TRL 14 3/8th shirt? I am making one as well but I want to see how loosely or tightly the rings fit.

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Posted on Thu Jul 18, 2013 6:33 pm
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Assuming .080" for the wire, AR is 5.6 iirc. The effect overall is somewhat coarse and fairly well open. Was that what you were trying to know? -- the weaving you were doing would already have told you that. You can do E6-1 in it.

That size is VERY frequently encountered in pix of Creative Anachronists wearing mail as it is reasonably durable under the kind of wear SCA fighting gives it.


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Posted on Thu Jul 18, 2013 11:41 pm
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The links in this shirt are slightly smaller, but AR is close, and it's AR that really determines the flexibility and appearance of the mail weave:

http://www.kultofathena.com/product.asp?item=SNC152XL&name=Chainmail+Haubergeon+-+Butted+High+Tensile+Wire+Rings+-+X-Large

It's going to look a lot like this, Lycenis.


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Posted on Fri Jul 19, 2013 12:05 am
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this is the 14swg 3/8th stainless shirt I made with a TRL kit years ago.

http://corvuschainmaille.ning.com/photo/danintriforce?context=album&albumId=2032108%3AAlbum%3A108716

here is a close up next to a penny.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/68156782@N02/9323403736/

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Posted on Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:00 am
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You know, I 1000% forgot I started this thread... It was only by chance that I happened upon a picture via Google Image Search that linked back to it... I was looking for Micromaille Shirt, and it linked to Dr T's (amazing) panther inlay shirt.

The last shirt I made was finished just before Halloween, and it turned out well enough... I've put on a bit of weight, and it was too tight then, so I know I won't be able to fit into it now. Going to the gym, now, and hope to be able to fit into BOTH of my suits before Midsummer Day (just an arbitrary goal I set; lose 45 LBS by June 21st).

Here's a pic of what it turned out to look like;



I am currently working on a new project... smallest rings I've ever used in a shirt. 18g 5/32, TRL's stainless steel and copper for the inlay. I don't have any pics of progress for the project yet, but I do have an IGP inlay pattern...



it's one that I attempted almost ten years ago with slightly larger rings, but the project was ruined when my wife put it into a coffee can and set it out in my shop in the missouri winter... apparently, moisture and aluminum are horrible things to expose galvy and copper to. I had been working with 17g 3/6 rings then, and I really, really underestimated how tiny the 18g 5/32 rings are in comparison to what I am using now...

So, now, real quick, what are the smallest rings you've ever used for a shirt/hauberk/haubergeon/what have you? This one is either going to be a vest or haubergeon... Still toying with whether or not to use my old, familiar strap and barrel, or try something different this time. Since the inlay itself will have more than 12,000 rings, I have time to decide.


Maille Code V2.0 T6.7 R5.3 Eo.f Fbyz MAg Whi$ Cew$ G3.25/0.55 I12.7/1.42 W24.29 Pa Dacdejtw Xa2g20p4t0w5 S03

^^^ Dude, this code is so out of date for me now... I don't even remember what it means! ^^^
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Brandon Cornwell

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Posted on Fri Mar 07, 2014 3:57 pm
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I talk about this one a lot: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/trevor.barker/farisles/guilds/armour/mail.htm

It copies a 15th century German shirt now known as Wallace Collection A2. The result is a livable, tailored shirt that you don't need to make belt loops for as it's not inclined to slide through a cinch belt and increasingly weigh upon your shoulders, through being made to hug your waist some. Well, it does if your natural waist is indeed smaller around than your hips and butt are.

While distinguishing between making a shoulder section by making either barrel-and-straps or by starting out making a rectangle with a forward-set neckhole is really just a matter of viewpoint by the time the last link goes into it, I call the Trevor Barker/Wallace A2 shirt's shoulder section a European Modified Square shoulder, as you really just build a rectangle that folds over the shoulders and you stick a couple of triangular expansion zones into it, port and starboard, from the back edge -- hence, modified.

The shirt suggests that back when they were wearing mail for keeps, their construction method seemed to be that they would prefab various-size rectangles of plain-weave E4-1 and keep these in inventory until somebody wanted a shirt, and then they would assemble the shirt from those prefabbed quadrilaterals until a shirt of the right general size was achieved. I imagine they could prefab those triangular expansions zones I spoke of too. Everything goes together pretty fast in the final stages, zip zip zip, here you are good sir.

Where I get this idea from is how the expansions and contractions are distributed. They are not spread throughout the weave, but concentrate altogether in specific places, with great expanses of plain-weave 4-1 between these. It's simple, just putting expansions/contractions at the edges of prefab pieces.

While these shirts-of-war never did have much decoration beyond dagged edges or brass accent links and borders, there's no reason you couldn't include an inlay panel suitably placed.


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Posted on Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:33 pm
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Well, I have seen some that use a 60* seam across the chest and shoulders to attach the sleeves, instead of just running the shoulders out, and making a 90* seam at the armpits... They seem to lay across the shoulders quite nicely, but I wonder at how well they do when lifting arms above the head, especially with a denser AR, like the one I am using... also, how well will the 60* seam work with the 18g 5/32 stainless rings? Will they be stressed much? I know that my strap and barrel sleeves and armpits are very sturdy, as here isn't very much going on down there... all just simple joints and straight maille.


Maille Code V2.0 T6.7 R5.3 Eo.f Fbyz MAg Whi$ Cew$ G3.25/0.55 I12.7/1.42 W24.29 Pa Dacdejtw Xa2g20p4t0w5 S03

^^^ Dude, this code is so out of date for me now... I don't even remember what it means! ^^^
The unintentional God of Chainmaille,
Brandon Cornwell

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Posted on Sun Mar 09, 2014 12:22 am
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That is a lovely inlay design!


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Posted on Mon Mar 10, 2014 3:23 pm
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Celtic, the short answer is that design has a reputation for troubles lifting your arms. Seems it has to do with the armpit join being set too low down in the pitz -- it should be pretty high up to allow undisturbed slack in the columnar direction of the mail weave as much as possible.

I call such shoulder sections of shirts "yoke tops," though "polygon tops" would be as applicable: the linkrows will go along straight for a space, then turn a corner and take off in a new direction. The simplest of these is the Bladeturner pattern of construction, where the linkrows turn four corners going around. If you laid that part of the mail out completely flat, it would look rather like a broad picture frame, with mitered corners.

This can be busted up into many more sides to the polygon, until finally you've got it so fined down you're nearly making a circular "mantle top" shoulder.


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Posted on Wed Mar 12, 2014 3:31 am
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Konstantin the Red wrote:
Celtic, the short answer is that design has a reputation for troubles lifting your arms. Seems it has to do with the armpit join being set too low down in the pitz -- it should be pretty high up to allow undisturbed slack in the columnar direction of the mail weave as much as possible.


I personally have never really had that particular problem... The worst I've had was that the seam was set too high in the armpit, and rubbed uncomfortably, much like a too tight shirt can. That was an easy enough fix, I just removed a row or two from that area, and everything was peachy again.

However, this shirt isn't going to really have sleeves... Imagine a broad shouldered vest, perhaps even open in the front, which leaves me more options for the yoke than I normally consider, since I won't have to worry about attaching sleeves or doing any sort of seam there.


Maille Code V2.0 T6.7 R5.3 Eo.f Fbyz MAg Whi$ Cew$ G3.25/0.55 I12.7/1.42 W24.29 Pa Dacdejtw Xa2g20p4t0w5 S03

^^^ Dude, this code is so out of date for me now... I don't even remember what it means! ^^^
The unintentional God of Chainmaille,
Brandon Cornwell

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