Shirts, shirts, shirts shirts shirts shirts! ERREHBODEH!
View previous topic | View next topic >
Post new topic Reply to topic
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Knitting Circle
   
Author Message

Joined: February 17, 2005
Posts: 349
Submissions: 19
Location: Fortuna, CA

Shirts, shirts, shirts shirts shirts shirts! ERREHBODEH!
Reply with quote
Posted on Sun Jun 16, 2013 10:13 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Okay, now that the gratuitious LMFAO/Lil Jon reference is out of the way, just a quick chatty question.

I'm coming up on completing my ninth shirt/hauberk/haubergeon/what have you (I never fully learned the name of each type, to be honest), and I was wondering, how many shirts have you guys made before you decided that it would be your last? I'm on my ninth, and I'm kinda feeling like it might be my graceful exit from the art of Maillemaking... It was almost three years between picking up the pliers for any sort of armoring, and my jewelery is in a similar predicament.

So how many shirts are enough? My first took me almost two years (I think i got it done at, like, 20 or 23 months in... LOTS of learning, trial, and error), whereas my second took me all of three months. My fastest was a copper vest for an XL+ sized guy in 12 days. Most of what I used was 14 gauge, 3/8 ID. First suit used 14g 1/4", eighth suit used 14g 5/16. Most of what I used was 125 KSI galvy. Currently on TRL's 14g 3/8 hard-as-hell stainless, with brass accents.

First suit is sitting in a shed about 3000 miles away from me, rusting away... it got left in Missouri. Second suit was sold at a ren fest for far too little, but I needed gas money. Third suit was a dress, got sold and shipped to the east coast somewhere. Fourth was shipped to Denmark. Fifth was another dress, sent to Montana, I think. Fifth was a suit sent to Iowa, sixth was the copper vest for someone in Pennsylvania, I think, seventh was a gift for a friend in Missouri, and the eighth was the juggernaut sitting in a box behind me here in California.

Number nine is almost done, and it's in a nice little heap on the ground behind me, next to the couch. Stainless is so shiny...<3 So is the brass, until it tarnishes... :/


Maille Code V2.0 T6.7 R5.3 Eo.f Fbyz MAg Whi$ Cew$ G3.25/0.55 I12.7/1.42 W24.29 Pa Dacdejtw Xa2g20p4t0w5 S03

^^^ Dude, this code is so out of date for me now... I don't even remember what it means! ^^^
The unintentional God of Chainmaille,
Brandon Cornwell

Joined: September 30, 2012
Posts: 255
Submissions: 13
Location: Kumla, Örebro Län, Sweden

Reply with quote
Posted on Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:00 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Euro 4 in 1 *applause* Very good job completing nine shirts! Also, one in 12 days??? That is amazing!

For the armor type: a shirt made from mail is a hauberk if knee-length and a haubergeon if mid-thigh length (wikipedia) Very Happy

Good luck and happy weaving!


"When in doubt... C4" - Jamie Hyneman

My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/wpa09
My band: http://www.facebook.com/carnosus

"This is an art form, and we love to be recognized for our own work, and we'd all hope not to be confused with someone else."
- Charon, March 27, 2009

Joined: November 25, 2010
Posts: 1727
Submissions: 100
Location: Es-whoy-malth B.C.

Reply with quote
Posted on Sun Jun 16, 2013 8:53 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

maybe exploring weave options for armors will keep you motivated in the craft. I've fallen into making coifs this year, it's a little more non-committal than an entire shirt but just as hard to sell so there's that.

Joined: March 27, 2002
Posts: 3496
Submissions: 1

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Jun 17, 2013 4:23 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

WpA is correct. Hauberk derives from OG and related language terms such as "heals beorg" -- it meant neck protection. Why neck specifically, ya got me.

We got it from the Normans, with some dialect forms like "haubert" too.

Haburgeon/haubergeon (take your choice) come from MF "hauberjon," a diminutive of hauberk -- the "little hauberk," as the term and the shirt came later. Short sleeves or half sleeves, 14th century, when plate armor was taking over on the limbs, and defense in depth was still the rule for the vital organs. They put more stuff on over the shirt, viz., the "pair of plates/coat of plates." Next century they shucked the haburgeon too, as their confidence in breastplates and backplates -- together, mind -- increased.

"Byrnie" is shortish to short, nearly sleeveless to completely so. Newb maillers often say it's a vest. It's a byrnie. Which word seems to mean absolutely nothing other than armor, of any and all sorts. Eventually it got Frenchified into "broigne," about the nature of which armor they were very vague. That word's an obscure one now.

Mail didn't quit after the fourteenth; it just didn't have the spotlight as top of the line gear any more. In plate armor for horsemen, it got ancillary use for centuries, armoring the armpit, groin and hips, where nothing else did as well for all their ingenuity trying to come up with stuff. Mail-shirts went to infantry -- haburgeon-length, sometimes definitely haburgeons, sometimes sporting long sleeves in haburgeon upper-thigh length.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: February 15, 2002
Posts: 388
Submissions: 10

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Jun 17, 2013 5:27 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I guess I'm "working" on shirts 3 and 4, made of 16 ga. x 5/16 stainless, and large hardened scales, respectively. Shirt 3 is currently a few large sheets of "cloth", and the scale shirt was completed a couple years back, but didn't fit right, and has been laying in a heap because I was pissed off that it had to be ripped apart and retailored.

My body is going through some major changes lately (widening in the chest/back, and thinning in the waist), which is going to mess with the scale fit even more. I spend too much time on my circus hobby (thus the body reshaping), and so haven't mailled in quite a while, though I still have rings and pliers in multiple rooms at home.


IGP (Irregular Grid Painter) Links:
Home | FAQ | Downloads

Joined: July 25, 2008
Posts: 844
Submissions: 0

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Jun 17, 2013 6:36 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I try and make sections of prefabbed maille between paying projects. a strip about 6" wide can be come part of a coif, avaintail, voiders, hauberk, or skirt with just a few seams.
its easy work when watching TV.
I gave up making money on hauberks after my first one.
then I made another 3 for friends and special circumstances, I continue to make other armour projects but the cheap imports make it a lot easier to point customers toward reputable shops like Icefalcon, knutt, Atlanta armoury, darkwood, and mailtec.
Those % have quaintly mail and good customer service as well as product support.
Ebay import mail can need repair or a few hours to remove the cosmoline, sometimes the product is really poor quality or workmanship.

Joined: March 29, 2002
Posts: 410
Submissions: 0

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jun 19, 2013 5:10 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I lost count years ago. Probably somewhere between 150 and 200.


weldedchainmail.com

Joined: November 25, 2010
Posts: 1727
Submissions: 100
Location: Es-whoy-malth B.C.

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jun 19, 2013 7:55 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I'd be more interested in how many different designs people have done. a shirt is a shirt and work is well, work, but if i don't make new shirt i don't want to work.

Joined: February 17, 2005
Posts: 349
Submissions: 19
Location: Fortuna, CA

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jun 20, 2013 9:21 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Thanks for the replies, guys!

Also, lol, I just realized I listed fifth twice, as two different suits. Maybe I am misremembering one of them. >_>;;


Maille Code V2.0 T6.7 R5.3 Eo.f Fbyz MAg Whi$ Cew$ G3.25/0.55 I12.7/1.42 W24.29 Pa Dacdejtw Xa2g20p4t0w5 S03

^^^ Dude, this code is so out of date for me now... I don't even remember what it means! ^^^
The unintentional God of Chainmaille,
Brandon Cornwell

Joined: March 26, 2002
Posts: 1923
Submissions: 576
Location: Chainmailland, Chainmailia

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:35 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

djgm wrote:
I'd be more interested in how many different designs people have done. a shirt is a shirt and work is well, work, but if i don't make new shirt i don't want to work.



Dr. T gets the award for shirt diversity.


Chainmailbasket.com (2019-01-01) - 376 + 79

Joined: August 10, 2004
Posts: 395
Submissions: 76
Location: Holland

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:23 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Chainmailbasket_com wrote:
Dr. T gets the award for shirt diversity.

Here here.

I'm still working on my first and second shirt (second will be finished first though).
Kudos for anyone having the fortitude of completing one Smile

Joined: February 15, 2002
Posts: 388
Submissions: 10

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:49 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Shirt designs

1: Barrel & straps - ill-fitting. Brought it to a maille gathering, ended up tearing it apart, fixing errors in the sheets, and then was shown Lord Charles' (LC) tailoring method (which uses the natural expansion/contraction of hanging maille fabric for tailoring).

2: Intended to be based on Trevor Barker's information (which uses triangles of maille to allow tailoring of a more form-fitting shirt), but received a request from a friend's daughter whose school was doing a play about Joan of Arc for a shirt of armor. I got her measurements, assembled it fairly quickly using the LC method, which would also allow it to be quickly split and then rebuilt to my size.

3. Again, intended be based on Trevor Barker's info, though it may get sewn to fabric and designed as samurai armor.

4. Large scales - not quite sure how it's going to be tailored, though I plan to use triangle or trapezoids to connect the shoulders.

I expect to make more shirts after this. Of the Euro 4-1 styles, I still need to try mantle and bladeturner (and possibly Trevor Barker's, if #3 ends up a samurai). When those are complete, I'll have a shirt of each of the known tailoring styles. I'll decide what I like best and make my final (and hopefully best-fitting) E4-1 shirt.


IGP (Irregular Grid Painter) Links:
Home | FAQ | Downloads

Joined: November 25, 2010
Posts: 1727
Submissions: 100
Location: Es-whoy-malth B.C.

Reply with quote
Posted on Fri Jun 21, 2013 2:39 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

I love drTs patterns too and the fact he does mostly key rings is impressive, but since it's all euro and hp variants he hardly takes the cake IMO.

Joined: August 30, 2008
Posts: 3101
Submissions: 20
Location: Burlington, ON, Canada

Reply with quote
Posted on Fri Jun 21, 2013 4:09 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

djgm wrote:
I love drTs patterns too and the fact he does mostly key rings is impressive, but since it's all euro and hp variants he hardly takes the cake IMO.


Hold one in your hands.
Watch him work for five minutes.

You'd change your tune in a matter of seconds.

Dude takes the cake... And ironically, his wife brings the cake when visiting NEMF.



Joined: February 17, 2005
Posts: 349
Submissions: 19
Location: Fortuna, CA

Reply with quote
Posted on Fri Jun 21, 2013 1:55 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Mmmm.... cake....

Definitely the best reason to go off topic. Very Happy

I want cake now, darnit...


Maille Code V2.0 T6.7 R5.3 Eo.f Fbyz MAg Whi$ Cew$ G3.25/0.55 I12.7/1.42 W24.29 Pa Dacdejtw Xa2g20p4t0w5 S03

^^^ Dude, this code is so out of date for me now... I don't even remember what it means! ^^^
The unintentional God of Chainmaille,
Brandon Cornwell

Post new topic Reply to topic
Jump to:  
Page 1 of 4. Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
All times are GMT. The time now is Sun Nov 17, 2019 4:23 am
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Knitting Circle
Display posts from previous: