Uniform winding
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Joined: April 2, 2012
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Uniform winding
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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 2:58 am
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What is up MAIL,

I wind my rings by hand. By hand I mean a pair of grip pliers and my thumb. Though Ive gotten better.at winding them evenly, but.theres.always a couple odd ones in my coils. I wonder if anyone has any tips for making a tighter, nore even coil, after all their winding experience.


-The Mighty Ramtide

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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 3:12 am
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I use a simple jig its basicly a piece of wood or plastic with two holes one for the mandrel Plus wire diamiter x2 and one for the wire. it can be a little undersized but the first coil will be a bit harder.
The holes are at right angles to each other with the wire hole slightly off center.

The jig makes the wire lays right next to the last coil as it winds.
Use softer woods like pine, or plastics like UHMW or HDPE.

Joined: October 9, 2011
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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 3:47 am
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I wind my coils the same way, and I get them made faster and cleaner by using a thick leather glove. Sometimes though, I wish I had a steel plate on the thumb to be able to press down the last part of a coil to get less waste wire. Coif LoL

Joined: April 2, 2012
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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 6:54 am
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Got a couple good pics? Ive been wanting a rig and some inspiration to build an effective one would be awesome.


-The Mighty Ramtide

Joined: May 07, 2008
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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 2:57 pm
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Ramtide you know that I always prefer power winding with a rig, to get highest possible safety AND ring uniformity - minimizing of waste is just a welcome side effect. To see images go to http://zili.de/maille/, and look for the canti* and coilrig* images, that show a couple of my jigs. These should tell you all what is needed. But a simple and just as effective rig, using the same principle, could be made already with a block of wood and some eyescrews, without sacrificing safety. See http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerylist.php?tags=Powerwind, first listed entry (but it might be good to look at the other listed entries as well, to collect ideas) - I prefer the slotted mandrel tip method shown there. Note that you should ALWAYS use an electronically regulated drill (with 'throttle trigger', and not the simple on-off trigger type) for powercoiling - it's simply needed to work safe.

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper Mfe.s Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Pj Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hi

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: June 9, 2012
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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 3:23 pm
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Being new and limited on resources, I've found that knitting needles are very inexpensive and handy mandrels. I don't know how they would stand up to anything more than 1/4 hard.

I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.

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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 4:47 pm
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Mandrels can come from a variety of sources, but I got mine from TRL. They come stamped in all sizes which can take it (3/32" ID and below can't, if I recall) and can be slotted for use in all systems which use slotted mandrels. I'm actually looking to replace mine soon, as I'm using a new coiling setup.

I don't have any pictures or video yet, but I've come up with a very handy design based on an enhanced jig I saw on YouTube. Whereas the enhanced jig used only one coil size, mine is fitted with a better wire feed guide and is equipped with interchangeable "heads". Rather than keeping multiple coiling jigs on-hand, you keep one jig and a variety of coiling heads.

My jig is not stationary, either. It can be held by hand, or placed in a portable vise for stability. It uses a system of rollers to apply tension to the wire, and TWO wire feed guides to ensure proper tracking. To date I have had only one backwound coil, and that was because I hadn't yet installed the second guide.

I'll try to get some documentation put up when I'm able.

NOTE: As with all power tools and equipment, safety is an absolute necessity. You can make a tool as safe as you want, but proper and careful operation is necessary to prevent injury. There is no mechanism in the history of machines which will prevent an accident with 100% certainty, other than the human capacity for good judgment.

Broken bones, deep lacerations, airborne shards, and all manner of other nasty things can happen when working with power coiling equipment. The wire can hook or loop, can whip around at the end of a coil, and can tangle if improperly dispensed from the spool. It is imperative that you keep an active eye on not just the coiling jig, but on the spool and your surroundings.

Don't want to discourage or frighten; just to warn. Power tools don't care what they cut/coil/mangle, and they won't stop operating for your meaty bits. Safety is key.


"What a man can be, he must be." ~Abraham Maslow

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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 5:04 pm
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for the longest time i hand wound.. i used bent rods before i switched to power winding. hmm.. here you go:
How I Make Chainmaille

much of that info is outdated, but it was accurate for when i was hand winding.. and before i did most of my work in stainless.

when you get out here i can show you my power winding technique.


PSA: remember to stretch.
3.o is fixing everything.

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Posted on Thu Jun 28, 2012 7:32 pm
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@hsingscrapper:
You can find 1 meter long steal rods for 3-4 at hardware stores.
And locking pliers for a little more money.
It's enough to have a mandrel for hand-winding.

This is not perfect however, and you will end with the same problem than Ramtide.
I can't help more, since I've switched to buying rings Razz

Joined: March 27, 2002
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Re: Uniform winding
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Posted on Fri Jun 29, 2012 9:19 pm
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Ramtide wrote:
I wind my rings by hand. By hand I mean a pair of grip pliers and my thumb. Though Ive gotten better.at winding them evenly, but.theres.always a couple odd ones in my coils. I wonder if anyone has any tips for making a tighter, nore even coil, after all their winding experience.


Welcome, Ramtide!

Well, that's a painful and wearing method of tensioning and steering your wire. You need relief for your thumb and some more leverage for your spartan-level coiling setup.

Find a drill and a small piece of scrap wood, something you can conveniently grasp, and about 10cm/4 inches long. Drill a hole across the middle of the bit of wood, straight through, to pass the wire through. Put the wire end through this hole and pass it on to however you secure it to your mandrel. When I use this kind of rig, I sit on something, stand the mandrel vertically and corral the bottom end with my feet, twirling it at the top with one hand and holding the wire-feed block in the other.

Grasp the bit of wood rather as if you were taking hold of the pull-starter cord on a lawnmower, allowing the wire to pass between your fingers on its way to the mandrel rod. Twirl the mandrel, using the feedblock in your hand to tension and manipulate the wire, pulling it up or down to close up gaps or keep it from starting to coil over. Your whole hand has a lot more power to steer the wire evenly than just your thumb.

You can make a hand feedblock work for powerwinding wire too, seen plenty of it among fellow SCA people, but a hands-free feed gadget is ever so much easier and a lot safer. As Zili suggests, look in Library: Gallery: Tools for inspirations.

Chen, to eliminate waste from uncoiled wire ends on the ends of a coil, get out your pliers and squeeze the straight end down around the mandrel -- about three or four chomps usually. Bends the wire into the coil just fine.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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Re: Uniform winding
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Posted on Fri Jun 29, 2012 10:04 pm
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Konstantin the Red wrote:
Chen, to eliminate waste from uncoiled wire ends on the ends of a coil, get out your pliers and squeeze the straight end down around the mandrel -- about three or four chomps usually. Bends the wire into the coil just fine.


This usually only works with soft or thin wire though, unless maybe I had pliers with even more leverage than my 18" linesmans Laughing

Joined: March 27, 2002
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Posted on Sat Jun 30, 2012 2:31 am
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Last time I did it, it was on 14ga galvanized, why? Sure you're not bending rod stock? Coif Cool Smiley

Come to think of it, do use slipjoints for this trick, though; their hollowing to the jaws suits the task.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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Posted on Sat Jun 30, 2012 4:56 am
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I've only tried bending a rod once for a mandrel setup, and it didn't end well considering I only used some linesmans haha.
But the I'll try the slip joints for reducing waste lol

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Posted on Sun Jul 01, 2012 8:32 am
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To produce an L mandrel or its 45 degree variant that looks like ____/, you want a bench vise. Stick about 4" of the rod into the vise, the rest of it pointing vertically at the ceiling. Using the whole length of the rod as a lever, bend by hand until the rest of the rod is at the angle you desire.

A notch-and-washer method of anchoring the wire end up at the twirler works very well, and frees up your clamping pliers for other tasks. With a triangular file, make a slanting cut or three in your mandrel, angled about like / / / to your mandrel's axis. Get a washer large enough to put your mandrel through the center hole. If there's a little extra room in there, it probably won't matter. No extra at all might be a bit of a nuisance, though, with heavier wire. You'll only use one cut at a time, but an extra file-cut can save you some seconds of hunting for it.

To use, bend the wire end up enough that it conveniently lies in the cut you made. Jam the washer down over the end of the wire, and twirl to coil. I like notch-and-washer because it doesn't make such a weak spot in the mandrel as a drilled hole might. A place that breaks easy has given real trouble with powerwinding, with a broken mandrel flailing around in circles.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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Posted on Sun Jul 01, 2012 3:39 pm
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Well I use the notch and washer method for mandrel/wire combinations that are used for low AR rings (less than ~2.5), as especially at low AR the needed mandrel weakening is most severe, irrespective whether a drilled hole or mandel tip slot is used. But else, I prefer a simple slotted mandrel tip, whenever possible, as it allows easy and quick work. Grab wire, coil, cut off, shove coil off the mandrel, and grab next - no further cutting or complicated manipulations needed. And if done right, the amount of wasted wire stays low - with a bit experience the waste amount is worth around one ring per coil, and up to a further one due to cutting the coils into rings. And this fact explains, why I prefer to use mandrels as long as possible - simply to minimize waste.

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper Mfe.s Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Pj Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hi

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

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