European 4 in 1 Vest Confusion
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European 4 in 1 Vest Confusion
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Posted on Tue May 15, 2012 6:13 pm
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I am a bit confused on how to take measurements for making a vest using european 4 in 1. I'm using 14 gauge galvanised steel rings and I'm not sure where to start for the vest. Does anyone know what I should do?


The Curator's Will be Done

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Posted on Wed May 16, 2012 5:10 am
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Welcome and well come, Abrahamx! I take it you are posting from outside the United States, from your spelling of 'galvanized?'

Not sure yet where your confusion lies. A vest is often called a "byrnie" in mailler parlance -- a Beowulf shirt, pretty short and pretty much sleeveless. In order of comprehensiveness, the next critter is the haburgeon, which goes to about mid thigh, and the hauberk, which goes to the kneecaps and almost invariably has the skirts split for convenience in riding. By the thirteenth century, a hauberk had long sleeves ending in mitts over the hands called mufflers (old word for mittens) and an integral coif. Covered you from kneecaps to bald spot in one single piece of equipment, saving only the palms of your hands.

Anyway, I refer you to my sole contribution to the mailling world in the Library --> Articles section here, "Hauberks for First-Timers, etc." and the estimable Trevor Barker's page on constructing tailored mail shirts that are not mere tubes of the "barrel & straps" persuasion: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/trevor.barker/farisles/guilds/armour/mail.htm. It is better about body tailoring than my article was.

For a byrnie-type shirt, the two basic measurements are your chest measurement, to which you then add about ten inches if you intend fighting in this byrnie, to accommodate both movement and your padded gambeson which you will wear beneath.

Unless you buy from some outfit like Historic Enterprises (not cheap; good!), you'd need to get friendly with a sewing machine and build your own. A nasty quick&dirty version would be a couple of sweatshirts and a sleeveless sweatshirt worn over each other. Strictly from Dagorhir, that kind of thing.

The second measurement you really want is the height of the shirt between high up in your armpit down to the hem of the shirt. DO NOT make the hem exactly crotch length -- above it or below it, and your man-tackle will thank you for your prudence. Mail is heavy and when it gets going it'll really slap. This height, with the chest + 10, will give you a rough idea of how much mail you're going to make to cover your torso. There's still the shoulder straps after that, but you can either measure or not, at your pleasure, because the length of a shoulder strap is super easy to adjust: just fill in rows between straps or add more rows on the ends. You can make up shoulder straps and a band around the chest, sort of an iron man-bra, and toss it on yourself to test fit, and proceed from there.

It works best for first-timers not to think "up and over" like a serape, but to think "around and close it," making (and tailoring) a rectangle as wide as your chest measurement plus ten inches when you stretch the mail out to its fullest stretch and as tall as that distance between armpit and hem. Close this into a big tube -- the barrel -- and put straps on the top, for the barrel & straps construction I mentioned. Follow Trevor Barker's how-to in tailoring a shirt and you can add good, workable sleeves on any time you like and they won't bind your arms even with the armpits closed up. A mail shirt with sleeves needs to be wider across the back than the chest, up at the chest measurement zone. It can taper slimmer towards the waist.

Okay, does that help?


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Posted on Wed May 16, 2012 8:58 pm
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Just thought I'd add, If you are making it in a tight AR like 14swg 5/16" for example, you won't find it very easy connecting patches. I always start at the neck and work my way down one ring at a time. Just measure as you go, the maille is the best thing for measuring.

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Posted on Wed Jul 04, 2012 7:58 am
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HEre is the Ring Lord's sizing chart. It uses their ring sizes and such, just follow it and it should give you a fairly good idea of whats needed for your hauberk.

http://theringlord.com/cart/shopcontent.asp?type=Euro4in1ShirtCalculator

there is also a calculator for a Coif, a Japanese shirt and a Scale shirt, all at this link:

http://theringlord.com/cart/shopcontent.asp?type=howmany


Hope this helps you, and anybody else who needs it.

Chris

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Posted on Fri Jul 06, 2012 6:03 pm
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We haven't heard back from Abrahamx; just the one post.

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