Fading or Meshing colors
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Joined: May 8, 2012
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Location: Colorado

Fading or Meshing colors
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Posted on Tue May 08, 2012 6:27 pm
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Hi I'm new to the world of chainmail and it is great. But to the question, I was wondering if their is a good rule for fading or meshing (not sure what to call it) one color to another or one color to BA? Confused Is their any articles or even tutorials on this. I cant find too many pics of this done.
thanks in advance

Joined: December 22, 2007
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Location: Hampton, Virginia USA

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Posted on Tue May 08, 2012 7:06 pm
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I think it's called color fading. With rings, you are kind of stuck with the colors the rings come in and deciding for yourself what looks nice together. One thing that I think looks nice is to use the order of colors that titanium and niobium naturally anodize in. Spiderchain has good pictures of this.

These are the pages you get when you do a search on "Anodized" in the gallery. You might find some color combinations you like in there.
http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerylist.php?tags=Anodized&page=1&norecs=50


"I am a leaf on the wind." ~ Wash
Lorraine's Chains
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Joined: May 8, 2012
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Location: Colorado

:)
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Posted on Wed May 09, 2012 4:16 pm
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Thats some great stuff but i wsa more curious about in a weave going from one color to the next in like a fading manner. sorry im not too descriptive. like say you have HP3in1 and went from red to bright aluminum, is there a good rule to bring them together not just end red then go into BA. sorry for the confusion i think thats what it would be called but if its called something else i would like to know.
thanks

Joined: March 3, 2002
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Posted on Wed May 09, 2012 5:12 pm
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gradient? is that the word you are seeking?


PSA: remember to stretch.
3.o is fixing everything.

Joined: February 15, 2002
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Posted on Wed May 09, 2012 5:59 pm
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If you don't have all of the in-between colors required to smoothly shift from one color to another, you're going to want to look at dithering methods.


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Joined: May 07, 2008
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Location: Germany, Herxheim

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Posted on Wed May 09, 2012 6:04 pm
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dragonman: As maille has such a rough 'raster grid', there are only limited possibilities when a smoother transition between two colors shall be achieved, if no interim colors are available.

A possible transition from XXXXXXXXXOOOOOOOOO to a smoother one could range from XXXXXXXXOXOOOOOOOO, to XXXXOXXXOXOOOXOOOO, or similar. But this is a matter of testing, as also the weave structure (alternating ring leans and so) has to be taken into account. If in doubt, there's no way to avoid experimenting - there are no standard recipes for.

For area color/material transitions (e.g. 'photorealistic' inlay work) you could have a look at possible raster and dither patterns and techniques, that are used by b/w computer printers for producing gray values - so a 2x2 pattern allows already three inbetween 'gray' steps from white to black if a fixed raster is used; a 3x3 one already eight, and so on - at the price of reduced effective image pixel resolution with increased number of gray values. Some 'weighted random' dither patterns allow somewhat finer structures, but are less easy to describe.

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper Mfe.s Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Pj Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hi

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

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