Chainmaille Backpack Advice?
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Joined: May 4, 2012
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Chainmaille Backpack Advice?
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Posted on Fri May 04, 2012 5:33 pm
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I'm going back to public school in August, and I want to make a small backpack out of chainmaille. Not too big, not too small. Not like a huge thing. Just like a small portable backpack. I'm a newbie, and I kinda think I know where to begin. But I'm not sure.

What I want it to look like, is like a large dice bag, with a flap. Make a round bottom and so on and so forth, with a triangle flap and the straps last.

I'm going to use aluminum wire, I have 17 gauge right now. Should I wait to get 16 gauge or a thicker gauge of wire?

How should I start out making it? All advice is appreciated! Thanks.

-Cyn


"Good people are good because they've come to wisdom through failure. We get very little wisdom from success, you know." - William Saroyan

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Posted on Fri May 04, 2012 8:36 pm
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I can't see aluminum holding up to the stress of a backpack very well. Maybe in a really tight AR, something like 12gauge 5/16", though that would get pretty heavy.

Joined: March 3, 2002
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Posted on Fri May 04, 2012 9:57 pm
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i would stainless.

i do not trust aluminum, especially for a high-stress item.


PSA: remember to stretch.
3.o is fixing everything.

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Posted on Sat May 05, 2012 3:55 am
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I'm just using it for maybe 2 spiral notebooks, a novel and pens and pencils. Other than that, I wouldn't use it for anything really heavy. But I do have 14 gauge gal. steel. That'd do it, but it'd be hard for me to bend. *Weak girl* And it'd probably take 5 times longer. Does anyone think the 16 gauge aluminum would hold up to those few items?

Thanks for the advice!


"Good people are good because they've come to wisdom through failure. We get very little wisdom from success, you know." - William Saroyan

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Posted on Sat May 05, 2012 5:55 am
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16swg 0.0625" wire wound on a 7/32" mandrel would be about as strong as you can make it while still allowing the european 4 in 1 pattern with expansions/contractions. I've never done any strength testing of anything though so I couldn't tell you really. I would guess it best to saw cut the links rather then a boltie cut so they don't slip out. Also use smaller maybe 5/32" for the expansion links it looks neater that way. The other thing is you didn't mention where your aluminum came from there are many different types and hardnesses. Some types are very weak.

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Posted on Sat May 05, 2012 7:05 am
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djgm wrote:
16swg 0.0625" wire wound on a 7/32" mandrel would be about as strong as you can make it while still allowing the european 4 in 1 pattern with expansions/contractions. I've never done any strength testing of anything though so I couldn't tell you really. I would guess it best to saw cut the links rather then a boltie cut so they don't slip out. Also use smaller maybe 5/32" for the expansion links it looks neater that way. The other thing is you didn't mention where your aluminum came from there are many different types and hardnesses. Some types are very weak.


I got mine from tractor supply, I'm not sure what kind it is. I don't have it with me right now. And I actually just ordered some more aluminum 16 gauge. Along with a jewelers saw. I knew if I was going to do it to make it last it'd be best to have a nice clean cut.And the wire I just ordered, the 16 gauge is Baygard. Thanks!


"Good people are good because they've come to wisdom through failure. We get very little wisdom from success, you know." - William Saroyan

Joined: March 3, 2002
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Posted on Sat May 05, 2012 12:35 pm
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aluminum electric fence wire is notoriously soft.

that same store probably sells spools of 17ga galvy.. it might be a good balance between 14ga galvy and 17ga al.


PSA: remember to stretch.
3.o is fixing everything.

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Posted on Sun May 06, 2012 2:00 am
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It sounds like your looking for a messanger bag or haver sack instead of a back pack.
Aluminum fence wire will tarnish and leave an gray oxide layer on clothing as it rubs against you.
I would start with something simple as a concept piece for leaning the process and the material propertys.

Cutting rings with a jewlers saw takes some time so have patience and take breaks. A lot of us use cut rings from suppliers or specialty equipment to cut our own.

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Posted on Sun May 06, 2012 2:55 am
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Just in case you are interested in some inspiration. Smile

http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=3949
http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=3950


"I am a leaf on the wind." ~ Wash
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Posted on Mon May 07, 2012 10:11 pm
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lorraine wrote:
Just in case you are interested in some inspiration. Smile

http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=3949
http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=3950


Wow. How come I've never seen that before?? Too cool! Very Happy

Joined: December 22, 2007
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Posted on Mon May 07, 2012 11:40 pm
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Jax25 wrote:
lorraine wrote:
Just in case you are interested in some inspiration. Smile

http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=3949
http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=3950


Wow. How come I've never seen that before?? Too cool! Very Happy

Because you are not as obsessive... I mean as AWESOME as I am?
<.<
>.>


"I am a leaf on the wind." ~ Wash
Lorraine's Chains
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Joined: May 08, 2010
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Posted on Tue May 08, 2012 6:40 pm
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I am neither as obsessive nor awesome as you, it's true.

Joined: March 3, 2002
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Posted on Tue May 08, 2012 8:25 pm
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this is why L is the gallery admin.

jax, you will have to memorize all 7300+ gallery entries if you ever hope to hold that position. Coif LoL


PSA: remember to stretch.
3.o is fixing everything.

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Posted on Thu May 17, 2012 4:02 pm
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That backpack is a heavy, saggy thing that doesn't work particularly well. It goes along with NimirRaCyndal's idea of making a giant dice bag with straps. That's really all it is, just with various weaves and angles, and I need one of those dumb front straps to make it stay up properly. If you make it that way, be prepared for it to crush and scratch even hardcover books, and possibly rip pages.

If you're going to make one out of aluminum or 17ga galvy, I'd say use a dense weave to make a bottom, both for strength and some rigidity. Even if you use 3/4 hard stainless like I did, make a good dense bottom so it'll hold its shape rather than crush inward. The bottom of mine is loose and floppy, and that was a mistake. For the straps, I prefer HP3S6, but I believe biased Euro4 would work as well. You want the angles these weaves offer so it's easier to connect to the backpack, and so it curves over and around your shoulders properly.

I made it to inspire some creativity, but in the last 5 years, I don't believe anyone else has made one. More than one person has asked for a tutorial, and I still won't do that, but I will post a few better pictures.

~Mical~

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