Newbie Introduction & Induction (Part the 2nd)
View previous topic | View next topic >
Post new topic This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Knitting Circle
   
Author Message

Joined: March 25, 2017
Posts: 1
Submissions: 0
Location: Cincinnati

New to this!
Reply with quote
Posted on Sun Mar 26, 2017 1:21 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

I'm new to this forum and to making maille in general. I've done mostly simple small pieces so far with rings from a hobby or. craft store, but really want to step it up and learn new things! I'm looking for suggestions on a good supplier and maybe what kind of rings to start with, sizes etc. Also looking for others that share this crazy hobby! Very Happy

Thanks!

Joined: March 29, 2017
Posts: 1
Submissions: 0
Location: United Kingdom

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Mar 29, 2017 11:11 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

My name is Ronald, i'm new user here



Joined: April 9, 2017
Posts: 1
Submissions: 0
Location: Texas

New to chainmaille
Reply with quote
Posted on Sun Apr 09, 2017 5:17 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hello all! My name is Kim, and I'm brand new to the world of chainmaille. I live in Texas, and my other hobbies include 3d modeling, drawing, crocheting,and playing piano. Nice to meet you all!

Joined: April 12, 2017
Posts: 6
Submissions: 4
Location: Moreno Valley California

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Apr 12, 2017 5:00 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hello Artisans. I'm Rue, a 53 year old toolmaker. I've been interested in maille for quite some time, though to be honest I've mostly just played with some basic jewelery type stuff. Some of it has been pretty nice, I think. I don't know how many times I've visited this site over the years, having a look around, though this time, my reason for visiting was a bit different than in the past. This time, I wantd to ask some questions, though for now I'll save those, as they may not belong in this thread.

I look forward to getting to know you.



Rue

Joined: April 18, 2017
Posts: 3
Submissions: 0
Location: the Milky Way

Introducing myself...
Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Apr 19, 2017 8:19 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hi guys! I am a chain maille newbie, having only been at it for about 2 years. In that time I've completed a couple projects, but I'm still figuring out the finer aspects of chain maille. I got involved in chain maille just after my dad finished his first project and I was like ,"Hey, that's really cool..." So here I am today, weaving as I type this. (Not really Smile )


When you're in calc class, thinking about how you could illustrate the chain rule in maille...

Joined: April 26, 2017
Posts: 1
Submissions: 0
Location: Washington, DC

Introductions
Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Apr 26, 2017 8:52 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hi I am new to the group. Just joined today. I have been reading your tutorials for a few months or more. I make mostly maille jewelry and maille cosplay costumes/accessories. My other interests include paper crafting, art, video games and sometimes balloon decor (I've stopped my balloon artistry for the most part because I love working with maille more). Thanks for all the helpful information you provide. It's been important to me so I thought it was time I joined the community myself.[/img]

Joined: November 21, 2011
Posts: 4
Submissions: 0
Location: New Hampshire, U.S.A.

Hello, I'm back!
Reply with quote
Posted on Sat Apr 29, 2017 7:05 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hello all! I've been away for far to long,(2011) and boy have I missed alot! So...let me REintroduce myself.
My name is Tiffanie, and I'm a collector of antique bottles, and out of print books. My favorite hobbies are creating art jewelry, and making messes!
I popped on to mailleartisans two days ago, and have discovered many new weaves, that are amazing, and can't wait to try them!
I have a few thought provoking questions for everyone. (1) Do you prefer buying rings, or make your own, and why. (2) How do you protect your rings from getting marred by your tools, and how many different products did you try, before finding something that works for you.
For me, I prefer to both buying rings, and making my own, and have found a few things that help protect my rings from tool marks, but nothing lasting, yet.


Wicked Lucy

Joined: April 18, 2017
Posts: 3
Submissions: 0
Location: the Milky Way

Re: Hello, I'm back!
Reply with quote
Posted on Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:04 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

WickedLucy wrote:

I have a few thought provoking questions for everyone. (1) Do you prefer buying rings, or make your own, and why.


I prefer to make my own rings because then I can match it easier if I run out, and I have the satisfaction of knowing I made my piece from nothing but a spool of wire, which is pretty impressive.


When you're in calc class, thinking about how you could illustrate the chain rule in maille...

Joined: January 3, 2017
Posts: 1
Submissions: 0
Location: the land of 10,000 frozen lakes

Reply with quote
Posted on Sun May 07, 2017 1:22 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hi I've been here a little while already but never introduced myself. I'm 38 years old and from the USA. I have been learning/making chainmail jewelry now since about last October. And very addicted to it.

Joined: May 27, 2017
Posts: 2
Submissions: 0

Greetings, Earthlings...
Reply with quote
Posted on Sat May 27, 2017 10:37 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I've been marauding around in the Weave Library, so I figured it might be nice if I joined Wink

I started looking at making chains because I designed and, after getting the notion to do so, have been making a couple of kalimbas/"thumb pianos" for the daughters of someone I know, one being about 14 and the other being about 6. Then I got the notion that it'd be nice if there was a convenient way to carry them. I'm making 2 layers of tines (the things you pluck to make the tone) and the top layer needs a "stop" to keep it from being screwed down too hard, and first I was just going to use hex nuts. But then I thought "tube", then "tube bead", then I discovered "bale beads" - OK! But, what to attach to the bale beads as handles? All the metal parts of the kalimbas are 304 stainless steel, so I started looking at chains. The only ones I liked, I couldn't afford, and the ones I could afford, well, ugh.... So I eventually fell over the info that "chain maille" techniques were also used to make, like, *chains* - I know, *DUH!*, right?
- So that's the short version of how I ended up here.
- I actually succeeded in making a short ((about 6")) length of "Rover"! I haven't taken any photos yet. Now I'm flailing away at "Abhainn". I'm using 18 gauge AWG/1mm wire; one size is 4mm or just a wee bit under ID, the other that I have on hand is 6mm ID.
- I had used some anodized titanium in the "Rover" piece, but then I got sidetracked onto heat-coloring 304 stainless steel rings, so that I could be consistent with the metal, sticking only with 304 stainless.
- After lots of searching online, I'm still ending up "making it up as I go along" ((wasn't that a Monty Python line...?)). I found only a very few tiny snippets of info regarding the temps that result in certain colors in 304SS, AND there is almost zero info regarding which part of a Butane mini0torch flame is what temperature - all I found was one video that was still pretty general.
- I'm going for "Violet", which OF COURSE is the most difficult/fleeting; using the furthest tip of the flame possible, the 1mm-thick-wire rings go very quickly from "bronze" to "sapphire"/dark blue. The Violet is very fleeting.
- I eventually will get some thin-as-possible Nichrome wire, because the steel rod I have on hand is thick enough to suck heat out of the section of the rings it contacts, so they end up being multicolored ((and mostly dark blue, since I end up overcompensating for the heat drain)).
- If I am able get some sort of a "method" figured out, I'll post an actual article and some photos.
- For now, all I can say is that I'm going to need MANY more rings...! ((Nope, not gonna make 'em myself - I have too many projects going on as it is... Surprised ))
- Well, that's all, folks! For now at least...

Joined: May 27, 2017
Posts: 2
Submissions: 0

Re: Hello, I'm back!
Reply with quote
Posted on Sat May 27, 2017 11:01 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

WickedLucy wrote:
(1) Do you prefer buying rings, or make your own, and why. (2) How do you protect your rings from getting marred by your tools, and how many different products did you try, before finding something that works for you.


I've been buying them, because I already have too many projects going on as it is, and they are also all very different, ranging from concrete to exotic hardwoods and now trying to learn to make chains, plus making things for myself and for the house. I'm just not prepared to take on one more project, LOL!!! There is also the question of what equipment I'd have to buy Surprised

I'm using pliers of various sorts that I had on hand, a couple of needle-nose ones that have smooth surfaces, and one that is, let's see, hmm, maybe 3/32 at the tip and is toothed. That one I like best for actually holding onto the 1mm-wire rings. BUT what I did was cut small sections off of "tough strip" bandages and wrap the tips of the pliers. None of the sets was bad on the stainless steel rings, but I also tried some anodized titanium and those just got chewed to bits, which surprised me because I thought Ti was supposed to be tougher than 304 stainless. Nope... Surprised
- I had tried some white athletic tape first, but that got chewed through far too quickly. Now I'm using store-brand waterproof "strong-strips". That seems to last longer. It also reduces scratching and improves the hold of the smooth-surface pliers, which previously had been more like ring *launchers* Surprised
- In the Stained Glass field, there are silicone tips sold which go onto the end of "breaking pliers" but I have no idea whether there is any such thing available for jewelry pliers.
- OTOH, just as I typed that, I remembered that I bought some moldable "DIY" night-guard things last week on Amazon ((to prevent nighttime grinding)), and there was quite a bit of material left over even just from the first one ((it was a set of 4)). The material is put into hot water to soften it and make it moldable.
- I should give that a try and see whether it works. I'm thinking it might not hold o the smooth-surface pliers, but what the heck, it's worth a few minutes to at least give it a try, just in case it does work!
- Meanwhile, though, cutting mini-strips off the ends of "waterproof strong-strip bandages" does work pretty well! And it's easy enough to remove and replace when it wears out.

- I hope that helps...! Very Happy

Joined: May 20, 2017
Posts: 6
Submissions: 0
Location: Amtgard Ominous Valley

Reply with quote
Posted on Sun May 28, 2017 1:29 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hey everyone! A week and a half late in saying hello here, but I'm saying it anyways! Amateur maille maker (14ga 1/4" ID E4-1 weave for a vest - hauberk is incredibly extensive, though I have 250 ft of 14ga galvanized wire to work through), hobby machinist, and someone who loves stories and construction.

If you are wondering about tools, I don't use needle nose, as I found they don't grip the rings quite right when I am using them. Instead, I use actual pliers with a firm grip so that I can close the rings most of the way before I actually close them (Allows me to see FULLY how the ring is going to sit. I'll get to the point where I get a feel for it... I hope).

I'm always looking for ways to improve the tools I've made (Coiling jig, basic U-shape of wood with holes for my 1/4" cold-rolled mandrel - aka a REALLY tough steel rod), and I'd like to see eventually what people think of my first project when I get it done.

Anyways, I'm just happy to be here, and be a part of an awesome community.


Everyone should have a summer of "Why Not". It allows you to do new things.

Joined: June 22, 2017
Posts: 1
Submissions: 0
Location: Antwerp, Belgium

Hi from Belgium
Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jun 22, 2017 8:17 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hi all,

I recently wanted to make a necklace and after some research made this.


Once I got the hang of it it went rather quickly. Still looking for a a closure thing that hangs at the front. I use a lock for now but that just doesn't look right.

Anyway, Hi to all!!

Dries

Joined: June 30, 2017
Posts: 1
Submissions: 0
Location: qld australia

Reply with quote
Posted on Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:55 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

hello the group,
my names leslie, like everone else i guess i have seen an item of mail that i thought would be cool to make. Did a google search and ended up here Smile. Got a fiftieth birthday coming up and its fancy dress, i'm thinking samurai costume as i started doing kendo recently so i was planning on using the kendo uniform with some adorments laying on top.Not sure if i should ask questions in an introduction post but i'll ask anyway lol. I'd like to cover a pair of kendo gloves in scale armour. One of my questions relates to the shape of the scales, i am guessing that the majority of images i see on google search are the ring lords leaf shape now i presume that that is because of convenence. i am wondering if there are any hard and fast rules on scale shape other than long enough to overlay one another and wide enough too cover two halves of each scale and dished. i presume the dishing adds a little rigidity and helps with overlaying the previous scale. can anyone add anything that i might have missed ?
These will be costume gloves not for kendo training so i think i'll sow them straight to the glove without the chain backing if that makes sense. Ok thanks in advance for any input.


bad decisions make for good stories

Joined: March 27, 2002
Posts: 3346
Submissions: 1

Reply with quote
Posted on Sat Jul 01, 2017 7:33 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Welcome and well come.

You guessed it; a bit of 3D shape to a scale makes it less likely to get bent and stick out all untidy -- in a word, it's stronger. Flat scales are pretty vulnerable in anything rougher than a costume environment.

Though serious personal defender scales tend to be an inch or two across, or else brigandine, in pieces approaching six inches by about three, rectangular -- and smaller as needed, but that there is usually about as large as they get.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Post new topic This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.
Jump to:  
Page 89 of 90. Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 88, 89, 90  Next
All times are GMT. The time now is Thu Nov 23, 2017 3:53 am
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Knitting Circle
Display posts from previous: