RInginator owners! Looking for your input...
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Joined: April 11, 2010
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Location: Yuma, AZ

RInginator owners! Looking for your input...
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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 7:59 am
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Greetings all,

I'm looking for any of you own/use the Ringinator to chime in here with whatever you might have to say to a potential buyer. I'm hoping to hear from you about your experiences with this unit. Specifically:

-What metals you have cut, in what sizes (ga. and/or I'd) and your results (satisfactory?)?
-Did you need/receive customer/tech support after the purchase?
-What drive source you use if you are using Jr.?
-Any other comments/gripes/suggestions you might have.
-set-up. Hints, difficulties, ect.

Background:

I have searched here and found many mentions and discussions that mentioned this unit, and I have read the manufacturers site.

As many of you might be, I am on a VERY tight budget. The proceeds from my sales (mostly key chains) are all that allow me to keep weaving. A purchase like this could allow me to expand my horizons, or could cost me several months worth of rings, essentially putting me out of the game for a long while.

That being said, any help you proud owners of the Ringinator could give me would be very helpful.


The shortest distance between two points is a straight line. The hard part is following the line.

Joined: February 01, 2009
Posts: 466
Submissions: 17
Location: Australia

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 10:15 am
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I've got one and i can speak very highly of it.

I've cut stainless, copper, brass, EC, silver, gold fill and niobium all with no troubles at all.

I typically use wire thicknesses between 0.8mm and 1.2mm mostly 0.8.

Mine is driven off a variable speed drill which i clamp into my vice. I thought about buying all the different pulleys so i wouldn't loose torque using the variable speed on the drill but like you was on a tight budget at the time and thought i'd see if i needed em first. Turned out i didn't and the speed variation built into the drill works fine.

The arbour block is excellent - no wobble at all, blades last for ages and ages with everything except stainless. Expect to use up a few blade cutting batches of stainless they dull pretty quickly.

I'm not a huge fan of the guide i have to admit. Having it loose didn't work all that well for me. When i'm doing big batches i set the height by spacing it with washers between the aluminium and plastic pieces and tightening it down hard. For small batches i don't use the top part at all and just push the coils along the bottom bit with my fingers - carefully.

I get replacement blades from Thurston. For small coils you can get away with the next size blade down it just fits through and they're a bit cheaper. I use blades between 0.006" and 0.01" depending on metal, thinner for softer metals, thicker for harder.

For lubrication i use thread cutting oil. I tip a bit on the blade between coils and dip each coil in oil before i start cutting it so theres always lubrication available.

It's worth the investment. Coupled with an extensive mandrel set you can make any size rings you want for alot cheaper. And you don't have to order them and wait. Just make sure you keep a stock of wire.

Joined: August 01, 2008
Posts: 232
Submissions: 1
Location: NY

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 11:26 am
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-What metals you have cut, in what sizes (ga. and/or I'd) and your results (satisfactory?)?

BA, Copper, Silver, Stainless Steel, Titanium

12g, 14g, 16g, 18g, 20g, 22g

BA ~25-30 lbs an hour Just like Martin Says. I don't suggest you put your drill or motor through that however.

Cuts everything I throw at it with relative ease. I use 0.006"/0.008"/0.010" blades and use soap/beeswax for small runs and cutting oil bath for larger runs. I get blades from Malco Saw Company, they are very high quality.

-Did you need/receive customer/tech support after the purchase?

Generally maillers are a pretty resourceful bunch. Its a pretty simple design and is simple to troubleshoot. So no.

-What drive source you use if you are using Jr.?

Unit 1: 1/2hp AC motor with custom machined pulleys. 6 speed settings for all metals.

Unit 2: 1/6hp DC motor with speed control. Direct drive with a flexible spline coupling. Infinite adjustment for all metals.

-Any other comments/gripes/suggestions you might have.

I really dislike the look of the Sr. model and thats why I have 2 Jr's and built my setups around them.

I would value each of my custom setups at ~$500 for parts and labor to make and put them together. Expect a better machine if you put more money in it.

You can save money by attaching the Jr. to a drill press or lathe. If you have one or both of those, its a good option. I like dedicated units so that's why I spent the money.

Each of my units are Jr's with a custom set-up/drive train by me. Contrary to Adrian, I like the plexi guide, Set at the right compression, it performs great. I would never use the rig without the guide because no matter how safe you think you are being, a cut off finger is seconds away. The first unit I got did not have springs so I had to add my own. Now, Martin is including nice heavy springs in the kits that make compressing the coils easy.

When Martin comes out with his coolant director/cover/splash guard I need 2. It should have been designed right up front.

I have the aptitude to design and make these myself, but after getting one and seeing that all the designing and engineering is done, its a small cost to pay for a completely finished design.

You could make a Harmony style cutting guide for much less money if that is an issue, but the Jr. is really nice IMO.

-set-up. Hints, difficulties, ect.

Keep the bushing lubed! If not you are going to run into many troubles. Run the saw at the right speed for the metal you are cutting. If you get crappy cuts it because the saw is too fast or two slow. Adjust the speed and most problems will disappear. That's why I have a $250+ motor and controller on my second unit, for on the fly speed changes.

You can set the Jr up any way you want with nearly any drive train you want. Want to run it off a small weed eater engine? Go ahead. Its infinitely customizable.

The Jr gets and A+ from me. I just wish I made it first.

Joined: March 27, 2009
Posts: 1015
Submissions: 4
Location: Southeastern Minnesota

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 1:00 pm
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I have cut BA, Copper, Silver, and Stainless in 12g, 16g, 18,g and 20g.

I love cutting BA since I can cut it so quickly. I am satisfied with the other materials, but I do not have a plain jewelers saw, so I cannot compare to that method.

I have received customer support at one time. I did not lubricate the bushing and it jammed on me after a long cutting session. I had an idea how to fix it (take it apart and clean everything), but before I messed with something, I wanted to check with the people who actually make them. The answer to my query came back quickly and they (by "they", I mean whoever I contacted through the Ringinator website) were very helpful. I had also contacted them several times with questions before my purchase. I find their customer service to be satisfactory.

I have the Sr model, so I cannot speak to any setup or drive source questions.

The only other problem I've had is difficulties in getting appropriate lubrication for the blade. Without a working splash guard, my liquid coolant/lubricant gets everywhere when the blade is moving at a high speed (i.e. for BA). My non-liquid lubricant (which is lard, based on someone else's suggestion) is rather messy and not much fun to use. I really should get some new lubricant, it's not like it's expensive, but I haven't gotten around to it yet.

Joined: May 07, 2008
Posts: 3615
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Location: Germany, Herxheim

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 1:14 pm
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I second and third the words above - in my experience the Ringinator is worth its money, if you need many rings of high cut quality, in any wished or needed diameter. I already cut Aluminium, Bronze, Stainless, Titanium and Niobium with it, in the wire diameter range of 0.6 to 1.6mm - the thinnest diameters are a bit tricky, especially in the harder materials. But with the right motor speed, and good blade lubrication/cooling you get long blade life time, and only minimal burrs - if at all.

I got the Ringinator Jr, and use it with belt/pulley drive, and a 200W (~1/4HP) motor that once was a wet/dry grinder, where I pick up at the slow running 'wet' shaft, while the fast running shaft is fitted with a small fan for some extra motor cooling. See images 1 2 3 4. There you also see that I use a small tupper container, and thin cutting oil for lubrication/cooling. With the right low-viscosity cutting fluid the saw dust settles quickly at the jar's bottom, and can be separated after a batch of rings is made, and due to low oil viscosity there's not even a splashing problem...

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper MAl Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Ps Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hip

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: August 01, 2008
Posts: 232
Submissions: 1
Location: NY

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 1:25 pm
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Nice setup ZiLi. When I get around to taking pictures maybe I'll update my post with them.

Joined: May 17, 2010
Posts: 41
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Location: Minnesota, USA

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 2:16 pm
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Thanks to everyone who answered, I too plan on buying a Ringinator Jr soon.

Edited and PM sent- Lorraine


I come in pieces.

Joined: March 27, 2009
Posts: 1015
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Location: Southeastern Minnesota

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 5:43 pm
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ZiLi wrote:
due to low oil viscosity there's not even a splashing problem...

Why would low viscosity prevent splashing? I have cutting fluid with low viscosity and it still splashes plenty when I cut BA. I thought the cutting speed was more important than the viscosity. Then again, I have a different setup to apply the fluid, so maybe that's it.

Joined: May 07, 2008
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Location: Germany, Herxheim

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 6:49 pm
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Vorondil wrote:
ZiLi wrote:
due to low oil viscosity there's not even a splashing problem...

Why would low viscosity prevent splashing? I have cutting fluid with low viscosity and it still splashes plenty when I cut BA. I thought the cutting speed was more important than the viscosity. Then again, I have a different setup to apply the fluid, so maybe that's it.


Surely, the cutting speed (blade rpm) is one factor, but it's ONE of several factors. The other important one is the viscosity - the thicker the oil is, the more of it is picked up by the blade. Thin oil provides a thin oil film, sufficient for all lubrication necessity, even if some extreme low-viscose fluid would be used. And cooling won't be changed much by viscosity, as the coolant-covered blade area doesn't change with viscosity, and depends only on the immersion depth, that is just around 1/8" or so in my case. In fact I can report only minor coolant losses - the coolant jar needs to be topped off only relatively seldom, so I can saw a couple of yards of coil inbetween refills.

The bottom line is, that oil that isn't picked up cannot be splashed away...

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper MAl Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Ps Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hip

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: March 27, 2009
Posts: 1015
Submissions: 4
Location: Southeastern Minnesota

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 7:11 pm
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That makes sense. I didn't think about it much at first, but the setup I have uses a pump to apply fluid directly to the spinning blade. That is probably where a lot of the "splashing" comes from.

Joined: January 29, 2005
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Location: St. Paul, MN

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 8:05 pm
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Quote:
I'm not a huge fan of the guide i have to admit. Having it loose didn't work all that well for me. When i'm doing big batches i set the height by spacing it with washers between the aluminium and plastic pieces and tightening it down hard. For small batches i don't use the top part at all and just push the coils along the bottom bit with my fingers - carefully.


The current ones all come with springs for the guide, so it doesnt vibrate apart and you dont have to adjust the wingnuts all the time.
PM/email if you need a set for yours. They're $5, but worth it.


Make saw cut rings: http://www.Ringinator.com/

Joined: May 07, 2008
Posts: 3615
Submissions: 149
Location: Germany, Herxheim

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Posted on Wed Aug 25, 2010 8:22 pm
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To add to Martin: I found it practical to use an additional set of washers for spring-loading the guide plate. And I use Nylon washers for this in the sequence plate, washer, spring, washer, wing nut - as shown in my photos. And I have not the slightest problem with the wing nut vibrating loose or so...

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper MAl Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Ps Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hip

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: August 01, 2008
Posts: 232
Submissions: 1
Location: NY

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Posted on Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:13 am
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ZiLi wrote:
washer, spring, washer, wing nut


The new kits include enough metal washers to do just what you are doing. I'll have to experiment with nylon washers though.

Joined: January 29, 2005
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Location: St. Paul, MN

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Posted on Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:53 am
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Why nylon? Any particular reason, or is that just what you had laying around?


Make saw cut rings: http://www.Ringinator.com/

Joined: August 30, 2008
Posts: 3119
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Location: Burlington, ON, Canada

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Posted on Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:54 am
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Martin wrote:
Why nylon? Any particular reason, or is that just what you had laying around?


I'm going to guess it has something to do with nylon damping vibration...
Part of the bonus of Nyloc nuts comes from this quality.
Just a thought, mind you.



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