Soldering experiment; please critique
View previous topic | View next topic >
Post new topic Reply to topic
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Wire Arts
   
Author Message

Joined: July 23, 2006
Posts: 2277
Submissions: 97
Location: Standish, Michigan, USA

Soldering experiment; please critique
Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 07, 2010 7:32 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

This was a soldering experiment. The pendant is made from sterling silver rings that were leftover from various chainmaille projects which have been soldered together and hammered.

Stats:

20ga sterling silver rings are varying IDs
24ga 1.3mm ID sterling silver rings
pearls






Insistence is futile.

We are the Quartz, lower your shovels and surrender your rocks. We will add your gemological and mineralogical distinctiveness to our own. You will adapt to service us. Resistance is rutile.

Handmaden Designs LLC
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Handmade Artists Shop
Author Website

Joined: March 12, 2003
Posts: 3058
Submissions: 74
Location: Tawas City

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:12 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

looks like it needs some filling in neer the cetermost ring. also there look to be 2 piont at the top ware the connections were missed or broke. and another one neer the bottom rigt. ither way it looks okay to me. mabye a little more polishin' (but that may just be the camera) though i think the dangles are over kill the "grapes" look fine on there own.


maille Code V2.0 T8.3 R6.4 Ep.f Fper Mfe.s Wsg$ Cpw$ G0.25-2.5 I0.5-30 N31.31 Pa Dacdjw Xa27g37w1 S94

Joined: May 07, 2008
Posts: 3615
Submissions: 149
Location: Germany, Herxheim

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 07, 2010 10:09 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Who has the courage to show such an enlarged close-up of a beginner's piece, asks for critique. And while Maxumx's notes are valid, there is also some potential visible, as making such a piece does not only need technical abilites, but also some artistic competence.

- I'd say, that the crack at top right in the photo was probably created while hammering the piece. Solution for that is resoldering to close the gap if one occurs, and maybe changing the solder used to another type that bonds better with the basis material, and maybe another flux. If your equipment allows, experiment a bit with chosen soldering temperature. Final solution is brazing/fusing, what is less prone to breaking.
- There is a shine/reflectivity difference between the 'grape' and the pearl attachment chains - tumbling (without pearls, but with their attachment wires already mounted, just not closed at the bottom) helps. With a bit care, the bottom 'eyes' of the pearl attachment can be filled with solder after attaching the pearls. If the piece is tumbled to high polish, a clean solder 'ball' gets the same shine; if you do a matte tumbling, using a bit steel wool helps to adjust the surface structure.
- Using a 1-1-1 chain segment for attaching the pearls is a matter of personal taste - here another weave, maybe/imho JPL might look better, while remaining harmonic with the center piece.
- And a little bit more care, to achieve more precision might be good for the pearl attachment points - But that's simply a matter of training.

The artistic potential is visible, imho it only lacks training and experience. Go on with that.

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper MAl Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Ps Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hip

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: July 23, 2006
Posts: 2277
Submissions: 97
Location: Standish, Michigan, USA

Reply with quote
Posted on Thu Jul 08, 2010 4:35 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Thanks for the advice!!

The difference in the polish is that the soldered "grapes" are hammered (and sanded to even out the surface) and the rest is not. I'm not entirely sure how to fix this.

The gap wasn't as large until hammering and was caused by that fact that if there is any gap at all at the joint my solder does not want to flow. Not wanting to remelt other areas I just let it be. I've been filing both sides of the joint so as to create a better connection and (hopefully) avoid the problem.

Right now the sterling silver solder I have is easy flow (second lowest melting point solder); I found out after buying it that I probably should have also bought hard and medium solders.

Any and all suggestions on how to make improvement is welcome!



Insistence is futile.

We are the Quartz, lower your shovels and surrender your rocks. We will add your gemological and mineralogical distinctiveness to our own. You will adapt to service us. Resistance is rutile.

Handmaden Designs LLC
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Handmade Artists Shop
Author Website

Joined: November 01, 2008
Posts: 11
Submissions: 0

Reply with quote
Posted on Mon Jul 12, 2010 7:12 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

From the pic it looks like you sued a lot of solder. From my experience you don't need very much at all... so long as the rings are very clean and very close together. I was using the smallest pieces that I could cut off the stick when I soldered the ends of two wires together.

the hard solder should be used near the middle of future pieces followed by medium and then easy as you get closer to the outside.

Solder isn't meant to fill in gaps, because of the way it likes to flow.

My experience in soldering is in using a torch, not a soldering iron. So some of this might not help.

But if you are using a torch, it's a good idea not to solder near beads or stones.

Also though... Circles are hard to solder together well since there is such a small surface that connects them.

Good luck!

Post new topic Reply to topic
Jump to:  
Page 1 of 1
All times are GMT. The time now is Fri Mar 22, 2019 7:30 pm
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Wire Arts
Display posts from previous: