Japanese chain garments as armor or kusari gusoku.
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Posted on Wed Jun 15, 2011 1:28 pm
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I will echo what others have said about the laquering being for corrosion reisistance that was definately a factor and Japan was not the only country that did this. Russia also laquered many of their pieces.

About the thin wire strength. I have had an opportunity to examine a Japanese piece closely and their wire although thin was very strong. It also was not the only source of protection like in Europe they had Keko (sp) that were also swen into the garment for added protection.


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6 in 1 kusari
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Posted on Thu Aug 25, 2011 9:48 am
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A few pictures of some rarely seen Japanese 6 in 1 kusari, a very dense looking armor.











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Posted on Thu Aug 25, 2011 5:23 pm
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Nice find!! Where did you ever come up with those pieces? I have been surfing the web trying to find pictures of this. Thanks for sharing.


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Posted on Sat Aug 27, 2011 7:37 am
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MusicMan wrote:
Nice find!! Where did you ever come up with those pieces? I have been surfing the web trying to find pictures of this. Thanks for sharing.
These are pictures of items that have been for sale, it has been pointed out to me that the second set of images is actually double butted links and not split links, it has been suggested that this would be called 12 in 2?

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Posted on Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:12 am
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american samurai wrote:
it has been pointed out to me that the second set of images is actually double butted links and not split links, it has been suggested that this would be called 12 in 2?

Yeah, japanese 12-2 is just kinged japanese 6-1.
Really good pictures by the way. Smile

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Posted on Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:37 pm
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You are right! I had thought that it was split rings, but looking closer some of them are separated and are definately double dutted rings.

Thanks again for sharing this is a really great find.


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Posted on Sun Sep 18, 2011 3:35 am
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Here is another kusari armor with an unusual pattern, there are not any good close up pictures but its interesting. There are only a few images in the world of a kusari tatami dou gusoku (a folding suit of armor with a mail chest armor).

















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Posted on Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:23 am
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that is some interesting armor you found there. It looks to me that it is all made up of what we would call the European 4 in 1 pattern or Nanban gusari. It looks like there may even possibly be European 6 in 1 on some of the more denser sections of the piece, but I can't tell from the pictures.

Another great find! Thanks for sharing. I am glad that you continue to come back and share your findings there are very few people who look into the historical armor and especially the Japanese gusari.

Thanks for sharing


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Posted on Wed Sep 21, 2011 10:39 am
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It looks like a usually E 4in1 and the and the metal-plates seem to be replaced by a E 6in1 or maybe even an E 8in1.


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Posted on Wed Sep 21, 2011 12:58 pm
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I would agree from what I can tell. As I look at the possible E 6-1 or 8-1 that is where I question if it is just a different wire that makes it look different or the larger rings allow for the possibility of the 6-1/8-1 possibility.


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Posted on Sun Oct 02, 2011 12:33 am
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Unfortunately there are no better close ups available, I would have liked to see exactly how the thicker looking areas were constructed. This just sold recently in Japan for a very high price for kusari armor and no more pictures were provided, it will now disappear never to be seen again.

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Posted on Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:43 pm
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These pics really help me get some inspiration for my next theater play. I am responsible for the whole visual make up, the haircuts, the skin colors, the costumes and I have invested a lot to make it as real as possible. I bought blemish balm for the faces to make the actors really pale, kilometers (at least that's what it fells like) of wire to weave the costumes, and the metal for the helmets too, as I want to be really medieval the pictures really give some good impressions on the details. Thanks for sharing

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Riveted Japanese mail (karakuri namban)
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Posted on Mon Aug 27, 2012 7:47 am
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There were up until now only two images available in the world of this armor type. Recently I purchased three matching armor items for the extremities (sangu) consisting of haidate (thigh armor), suneate (shin armor) and kote (armored sleeves). These historical items were being sold in three different auctions and would have been split up never to be seen again. I know of only two reverences to riveted kusari, one in late 1700's book "The manufacture of armour and helmets in sixteenth century Japan" = (Chukokatchu seisakuben) Author :Sakakibara, Kozan,Translated by T. Wakameda ; Rev. by A. J. Koop and Hogitaro Indada, 1912 ; Rev. and edited by H. Russell Robinson, 1962.
Publisher London : Holland Press, 1963. pp 83-85.

Quote:
"karakuri-namban (riveted namban), with stout links each closed by a rivet. Its invention is credited to Fukushima Dembei Kunitaka, pupil, of Hojo Awa no Kami Ujifusa, but it is also said to be derived directly from foreign models. It is heavy because the links are tinned (biakuro-nagashi) and these are also sharp edged because they are punched out of iron plate."
.

George Cameron Stone mentions a "kote with riveted European-style 4-in-1'' image # 475.10 in his book "A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armor: in All Countries and in All Times". The only image of rivered kusari I have seen published is in "Japanese Arms & Armor Introduction by Robinson, H Russell", 1969 P.58 , the image is listed as being an "Early 19th century breastplate from Museo Orientale Venice", in addition Dave Thatcher told me that he has seen this type before in Sasama's big book which I have do not have a copy of and have not seen.

The remaining question is whether this example was of Japanese manufacture or was this some foreign type acquired by an Japanese armor maker and used to make this particular armor. The links are not lacquered black as other types of Japanese mail, the links have the appearance of being possibly tinned or galvanized and as to the comparison of other types of riveted mail, the links do not look like eastern riveted mail samples that I have seen or like European riveted mail links.

I showed some images of the links to Ian Bottomley and he was kind enough to give an opinion the this looks like it may be riveted mail of Japanese manufacture due to the fact that in Eastern mail the riveted links are connected by solid links and the rivets are peened on both sides and not wedge riveted.

European riveted mail links are riveted with a wedge shaped rivet. The mail I have was made with eastern type rivets but all the links are riveted with no solid links.

Indian riveted mail


European wedge riveted mail




Japanese riveted kusari kote, haidate and suneate.


















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Posted on Mon Aug 27, 2012 7:03 pm
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that is a great find! The pictures you show remind me of some Indo-Persian pieces I analyzed one time. They were not mounted to fabric, but there are some real similarities in the riveting techniques.

Those are great finds. thanks for sharing. again Coif Smiley


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8 in 1 mail used in the construction of a kusari katabira.
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Posted on Wed Nov 21, 2012 2:19 pm
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This is the first confirmed use of 8 in 1 mail in the construction of antique armor that I know of, it is an Edo period kusari katabira with an 8 in 1 mail strip covering the shoulder area. This is probably the same method used in the kusari tatami dou previously pictured.






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