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Joined: March 26, 2019
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Posted on Sat Apr 06, 2019 3:26 am
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I like what you have so far! The metal shoulders would typically connect to an arming doublet, if I understand history properly. This would be the gambeson that goes under your maille to protect you from losing your skin to the friction of the rings as well as provide additional protection from weapons. My first chainmaille is only a little further along than yours, so keep up the updates!

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Posted on Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:08 am
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Nice thing about thonging them onto an armyng-doublet beneath the shirt is that the shirt and the spaudler-ish bits are now both free to do each their own thing -- staying where you put them and want them -- without getting hung up on each other.

Over on the Armour Archive (armourarchive.org) we labored and studied and experimented and tried to replicate things we saw in period depictions of suits of armor -- and what came down to us as really the best way with plate parts, however much and regardless of how much mail was also involved -- was that lacing armor bits into place upon an arming-cote held plate pieces up, while leather straps and buckles best served to hold the pieces in. Though this is only a general rule and some individual exceptions to it may be found.

Such an exception is the German 15th/16th-century plate-armour arm -- it's entirely tied on. Exclusive of the shoulder armor -- usually spaudlers not pauldrons -- it is three separate pieces of metal, all tied onto a sleeve beneath them. The elbow is a rather all-encompassing piece of ingenuity in the rough form of two broad cones intersecting at an angle, giving freedom to bend the elbow completely, as far as it can go. The vambrace below it and the rerebrace above it are also tied on, and the elbow gets tied on above and below the elbow's actual hinge, showing two distinct knots on the exterior of the steel elbow. In armouring parlance, these laces are known as "points," and variously spelt into the bargain.

The nicest thing about using cordage points instead of leather strapping and buckles is they are super easy to fine-adjust, much easier to field-repair if they break, and just as flexible as they need to be. And less fuss to replace; essentially, they are shoe- or boot-laces. The medievals bought them in bundles to tie clothes items together, and the armor toters seemed to regard them as expendables and likewise kept many around. Points are efficient and they're compact; they don't need a lot of room, and don't lump up under anything.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: March 29, 2005
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Posted on Fri Apr 12, 2019 2:22 pm
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Red makes several very good (and informatively historically accurate) points here: I remember my first attempts to marry chain with fabric, I worked with waxed cotton and as a result (and the lack of neatness in my closures) the results demarried with depressing regularity!

Thick thonging to well established, reinforced and hardy anchor points on the fabric; is a lesson hard learned but easily shared. Smile

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Posted on Tue Apr 16, 2019 9:30 am
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"Theophilus Thtwithle, the thuccethful thithle thifter, thang thick thongs to the twang of his thumb..."

"Theophilus, don't go there. It'll totally tungle your tang."

"If my Tang(tm) gets tungled, I'll have to throw out the whole jar."

Joined: October 6, 2018
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Posted on Mon Apr 29, 2019 11:54 am
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My son took his chain mail on its first proper outing this weekend.
He said it was good but I am eagerly waiting pictures Smile


Question: Are there any articles on the site about edging? Either leather hem or alternative weave? My search-fu has failed.

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Posted on Mon Apr 29, 2019 10:12 pm
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Edging? Well, I hesitate to apply leather edging to the hem of a shirt, on the grounds it would impair the resilient motion of mail. Same for sleeves if any. Something up at the neckhole, which doesn't really do the expand/contract along the resilient direction, now there you might be talkin'. Say, something like a mandarin, or standing, collar in middleweight leather and tooled. I mention leather tooling because I think you're motivated by wanting to do something decorative. Good stuff!

Mail-ish decoration in the classic manner frequently meant using contrasting metals -- brass of course, gilt brass for the really swanky. Contrasting-metal stripes (historic), individual links in any possible pattern (not historic, more fantasy-oriented so good for conventions, LARPing) and accessorizing triangular dags with contrasting metal and dagging the hem with contrasting metal entirely.

A handsome (and not so restrictive of mail's resiliency, though apparently it constrains it a little) edge decoration on a shirt of E4-1 is the variant E8-1. It requires using finer wire for the same link ID, and produces an effect like the edge stitching on an embroidery patch. I've seen it; it's sumptuous.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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Posted on Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:04 am
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Thanks for the suggestions Smile

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Posted on Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:54 am
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I found Byzantine to be rather pretty.

I'll see if I can paste the gallery link

http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=7944

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Posted on Tue Apr 30, 2019 3:04 pm
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ClymAngus wrote:
I found Byzantine to be rather pretty.

I'll see if I can paste the gallery link

http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=7944


Ooh!

Joined: March 29, 2005
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Posted on Tue Apr 30, 2019 4:15 pm
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Not the only thing you can do by any stretch of the imagination, you can back link as well. Depending on your gauge of link, sure there's a bit of play and overlap but nothing terrible certainly. I've back edged 4 in 1 guitar straps and had no complaints from the artists involved.

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Posted on Mon May 27, 2019 6:21 pm
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The chainmail recently went to an event. Worked well.
But more to do, as can be seen:





Joined: March 29, 2005
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Posted on Tue May 28, 2019 2:05 pm
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Those are tanking shoulders sir! I can see that the waist size is good (god knows how you get those shoulders though the waist tube, Oh to be young and unencumbered by a paunch!)

My rapidly retreating youthful frame aside, I've noticed your shoulder straps are looking a little stressed. How were you thinking of remedying that? Or was this a style choice? I mean no offence here, there is making and then there is tailoring. Many tailoring choices are personal ones. I would never presume that this look is not an intended one. Irrespective, there is a lot of work here, you should feel justly proud.

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Posted on Sun Jun 02, 2019 10:29 am
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Afraid I carry my share of beer muscle, so those tanking shoulders belong to my son. Smile

He gyms alot so I am planning on letting it out by 2 - 4 links. Also, the slit in the back greatly helps getting it on and off and gives it a nice form fitted appearance. Handy if you have good form!

I also plan on working on the shoulders, to slowly make the neck more tailoured. I will probably do that after I have added to the overall length.

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