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Joined: October 18, 2018
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Location: California

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Posted on Wed Dec 26, 2018 12:38 am
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Hi there. My name is Ash and I'm a beginner to chainmaille. Been spending at least a few hrs everyday for the last couple months. Trying to set up my own cooling and winding jig. Got a punch set for Mandrel s and was wondering if I could get some advice on how to put a hole for the wire into my mandrels? Didn't see this in any articles I've read any advice? Confused

Joined: July 17, 2009
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Location: Denver, Colorado

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Posted on Wed Dec 26, 2018 2:07 am
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Welcome. I always like to see new people learning the craft.

A punch set does make good mandrels, but it is hardened tool steel. It will be very difficult to drill a hole. You will need to find another way to hold the wire.

I have had some success using a "shaft collar" and tucking the wire in between that and the rod. Follow link below to see a "shaft collar".
https://www.homedepot.com/p/The-Hillman-Group-3-4x1-1-4x9-16-Shaft-Collars-838622/202242254
It doesn't have to be the exact size of your rod, a little bigger is good to make room for the wire to squeeze in.



Joined: March 27, 2002
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Posted on Wed Dec 26, 2018 6:53 am
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Welcome and well come -- yeah, there are tons of ways to do this and you don't need to lay out the cash for a punch set.

All you need is steel rod stock from a hardware store @ roughly a dollar a foot. Here are several pages of pix onsite for windlass-type wire coilers and a few power coilers: http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerylist.php?tags=Coiling

And mine, which wants the "Coiling" tag: http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=900

That picture shows two ways to anchor your wire for making coils that don't need you to drill any holes -- a hacksawed end-slot at one end of the mandrel and a notch-and-washer anchor at the other.

For that washer anchor for the wire: get a washer that slips loosely over your mandrel -- rather sloppy is better than tight. Take a triangular file and file three slanted cuts near one end of that mandrel, leaving a few inches at the end for your turning power -- anything from a vise-grip to a power drill as shown above. Slant the three cuts about 45 degrees, arranged around the end of the mandrel like / / /. You'll only use one cut at a time, but with three there's always one convenient to you. A bench vise for the rod will make this the work of a moment. Gently bend the end of your wire up to lay the wire end in one of the cuts. Jam the washer down on the end of the wire to anchor it to the mandrel. Start the mandrel turning to coil. If you are hand cranking, I recommend the use of a wooden feed-block for your wire to save beating up your hands -- just a bit of wood or thickish doweling with a hole drilled across its middle to feed the wire through. Let the wire pass to your mandrel between your middle and ring fingers as you grasp the block.

AND I SEE I'M TOTALLY REPEATING MYSELF FROM LAST OCTOBER! Rolling Eyes [/size]


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: March 27, 2002
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Posted on Tue Jan 15, 2019 8:07 am
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If you'd really rather have the hole, which also unavoidably weakens the mandrel at the hole location -- bad for small-diameter mandrels in particular, than the notch-and-washer, here's how.

1. It's easier with a drill press, and the drill press doesn't need to be large, unusually powerful, or even fancy at all.

2. With triangular file or alternatively a hacksaw, cut a shallow X mark at the hole location. Some good way to hold the X-marked mandrel firmly in place, X uppermost is wanted. The cut is about the size of these X's.

3. 1 drop of oil or water on the center of the X to cool the bit, preventing dulling it by overheating and killing its temper. If in the course of drilling you think it could use another drop, apply it.

4. Drill through the center of the X, which will keep the bit from wandering and getting off the round rod. { Mad }

4a. An optional touch is to chamfer both ends of the drilled hole when you've drilled it. Use the biggest bit, or a chamfer bit (there is such a thing) and just gently touch the hole's ends, making it a little smoother to put the wire in, and no leaving of a burr anywhere.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: October 18, 2018
Posts: 6
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Location: California

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Posted on Fri Jan 18, 2019 3:51 pm
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Thanks for the tips. Just looking back at posts. I get on everyday but usually just looking up new weaves almost forgot about the forums!

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