Gloves for working with steel?
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Joined: April 13, 2013
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Gloves for working with steel?
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Posted on Tue Mar 03, 2015 3:28 am
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I've been trying to search online for a type of glove that really only covers the meaty part of the palm on the thumb side to protect my palms from the pliers when working with steel rings.

Does anyone know if something like that exists? I either find gloves made out of chainmaille or regular leather work gloves. I'm not coming up with a good description for online searching.

I don't want to use typical work gloves because I don't want my fingers covered. But when working with steel I find my palms getting sore from the pressure being used to open and close them.

Any ideas greatly appreciated, even if it's just a better term to use when searching!

Jen

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Posted on Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:13 am
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Motorcycle gloves have padding in all the right places. A better solution though would be to just get used to your pliers more. Maybe change your grip until you find something more comfortable.

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Posted on Tue Mar 03, 2015 4:45 am
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Weightlifters gloved



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Posted on Tue Mar 03, 2015 6:55 am
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You could cut the fingers off the work gloves. I know the pressure bruising you are talking about. I find I get it when using small pliers that fit inside my palm. Maybe using bigger pliers will help.

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Posted on Tue Mar 03, 2015 9:08 am
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Bicycling gloves do that too. Try at Sport Chalet or such.

Even better, is adapting your hands. The first day working with steel -- and this kind of time varies with thickness of wire and similarly varies with hardness if you're using something special -- you are probably good for about an hour of pliers time. Then, down tools, without fail. Tomorrow, the same -- about an hour, no more.

After about three days of no more than an hour, extend your mailling time fifteen or twenty minutes. And quit for the day after that added time has been gone through.

Two or three days at this new amount of time, add on another quarter of an hour.

It takes the palms of your hands about a week to adapt to the pressure of your pliers handles. Whatever you do, don't play through pain: the moment your palms begin to ache, put the pliers down and rest your hands from mail twenty-four hours. Your flesh needs the recovery time, and the less of a beating you've actually given your hands, the faster they will heal completely.

I work up to about three hours' straight at it. When my lower back starts hurting from bending over the work, I figure it's about time to go do something else, and come back next day.

You can also take going on half the labor out of it if you open some links by pre-stretching the coil, rather than opening them individually as you seem to be doing. Grab either end of the coil, stretch it to about two and a quarter times its original length, then cut the stretched coil just as you would a regular one. In just one coil you've opened up over a hundred links all in one second: no need to use pliers to open links up before starting.

Store pre-opened links separately from raw, cut links or closed links. Pre-opened links are very tangly. You're going to retrieve them out of their storage can in clumps, in fact. Just lift out a clump with your plier jaws, and tap the clump on your worksurface, using the links that fall off it. Take and tap the clump again when those links are all gone, use those deciduous links, and so on 'til you've woven the entire clump's worth.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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Posted on Tue Mar 03, 2015 12:13 pm
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Maybe your pliers' handles are too thin? and/or too short?
If it's the case, wrapping them in a plastic tube or old fabric should help.

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Posted on Tue Mar 03, 2015 1:45 pm
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Konstantin the Red wrote:
You can also take going on half the labor out of it if you open some links by pre-stretching the coil, rather than opening them individually as you seem to be doing. Grab either end of the coil, stretch it to about two and a quarter times its original length, then cut the stretched coil just as you would a regular one. In just one coil you've opened up over a hundred links all in one second: no need to use pliers to open links up before starting.


Stretching coils to yield pre-opened rings is only recommended with applications in which lower quality rings are acceptable. Armour, and other larger AR clothing type applications. Not with smaller rings, and especially smaller AR rings used in jewellery, inlays, and decorative stuff, since each ring will be warped more so than from regular coiling and cutting.


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Posted on Tue Mar 03, 2015 5:23 pm
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A lot of us use vet wrap to increase the handle diameter.
It helps some, there are a few different technique for holding the pliers as well.
Another option it to look at how the pliers grip the ring.
After all its just a lever, angle of contact and length can be adapted to suit your needs.

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Posted on Thu Apr 02, 2015 2:04 pm
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I use a couple of layers of dual wall heat shrink (the sort that has an adhesive layer in it) to bulk out (and lengthen) the handles of my pliers.


Maille Code V2.0 T5.4 R4.5 Eo.p Fj12.2 MFe.s Wg$i C$p G0.5-1.5 I1.2-10.8 N16.16 Pt Dcejt Xa6g14 S07 Hc
Articles - Byzantine Speed Weaving - Poor Man's Tumbler - Ring Jig - Turk's Head Knot Ring - Wire Winding
Maille - Belt - Choker w. Padlock - Collar - Collar with Twist - Cuffs - Cuff 2 - Decorative Chains - DS Belt - Maille Cuffs - Micro Ring - T Shirt - Vambrace - Watch Band - Watch Chain
Non-maille - Ring - Ring Mk II

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