Liner for Choker/Necklace
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Joined: March 30, 2014
Posts: 2
Submissions: 0
Location: MIdwest

Liner for Choker/Necklace
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Posted on Sun Mar 30, 2014 7:41 am
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Hi,

I've been making chokers and necklaces from aluminum jump rings and although they look very nice some people have had (what I'm guessing is) an allergic reaction while wearing them.

Is there some treatment for the rings, or a kind of liner that I could add to mitigate this problem?

If a liner, what materials work best and how would you go about attaching it to the jewelry. I'm very new to all of this so I apologize if this has been covered a million times, I didn't see anything about it when I searched.

Thanks for any help. Smile

Joined: July 25, 2008
Posts: 843
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Posted on Sun Mar 30, 2014 2:35 pm
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Allergic reactions to aluminum are very rare.
Most aluminum naturally oxidized, most of use bright aluminum alloys.

It's much more likely to be grim building up in the mail and redistributing onto the skin. Cosmetics, sun screen, and dust buildup on the skin quickly at summer festivals.
Coatings like rennassance wax and some surface coatings help for a time but eventually wear off or flake due to the dynamic nature of mail.
The best option for aluminum I find is to tumble it, and explain how the customer can clean it at home with blue dawn dishsoap, water, and air dry.
Be careful though as some clasps are "plated steel" that will rust with this kind of care regimen.

As for lining a choker velvet and leather seam popular and a basic whip stich will holdup well. You just need to watch your closures as the thread will wear or slip between the rings over time.
A few of my customers also wear chokers and necklaces over high collared shirts for their steampunk attire.

That said some people have body chemistry that will react with the aluminum and other metals. Sometimes the body chemistry shifts with medications, diet, or things that effect hormone levels.

Copper, brass, and bronze have many of the same issues.
Understanding the difference between an alergic reaction and transfer of oxides or tarnish help explain care and feeding of jewlery help build a relationship with the customer and often yealds additional sales as well as word or mouth advertising.

Joined: March 30, 2014
Posts: 2
Submissions: 0
Location: MIdwest

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Posted on Mon Mar 31, 2014 7:28 am
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Thank you so much for your reply.

The reason I called it an allergic reaction is because that was how the customer described it, I didn't see the actual results, just refunded the purchase price. Also, the customer only had the choker for about 2 days before reporting the problem, I'm not sure if that makes any difference.

I'm pretty clueless about the "whip stitch" you mentioned, do you have a source where I could learn more? I think that's the route I'm going to need to take.

Thanks again!

Joined: September 02, 2003
Posts: 115
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Location: Darwin, Australia

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Posted on Tue Apr 01, 2014 2:04 am
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I just don't use BA as where I live it tarnishes pretty fast, and even detergent doesn't help it. There's no way for the average customer to easily clean it. Colder climates (with less reactive skin) may have more success however. Could you consider using anodised aluminium instead if you continue to find it a problem?

Though if they are truly allergic, even anodised won't help. That's pretty rare but it does happen. If so (do they have the specific symptoms of an allergy? as a seller you have to learn this), tell the customer they are one in a thousand and recommend a different metal.

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