No longer cutting rings with an overlap
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Joined: January 25, 2013
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Location: US

No longer cutting rings with an overlap
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Posted on Sun Dec 08, 2013 7:06 am
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Hi guys,

I recently broke myself of the habit of cutting my rings with an overlap in them (using a pair of end nippers with a space removed to "skip" to the next ring.)

The reason I stopped is because, using this method, I find it hard to make rings with overlaps of uniform size, which results in too much variation in my individual rings. By cutting my rings first and then overlapping them manually, I am able to cut at an angle, producing the "snakehead" shape to the overlap.

I plan to coil my rings on a mandrel larger than 5/16, cut them out, and then overlap them down so that the final ID is 5/16.

Question is, does anyone know of a quick and easy way to overlap rings manually? For example, is there a way to modify piers in such a way to make the final ring perfectly round? I know that Konstantin once mentioned a method for putting the rings on the desired mandrel ID and bending them around it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated my friends.

Joined: June 20, 2012
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Location: France

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Posted on Sun Dec 08, 2013 11:00 am
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Re-coiling individual rings?
I have done that with 1.5mm WD dead-soft aluminium, and I won't even think about daring doing it again with any harder wire.

Joined: March 12, 2003
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Location: Tawas City

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Posted on Mon Dec 09, 2013 1:10 am
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get your self a block of steel 1x1x0.5 ish.

drill a 5/16(or slightly smaller) hole through it. and then use a counter sink bit to off set the hole to the larger diameter. the counter sink should to be a high angle, 60 degrees prolly enough. Next make a little wood plunger to force the ring through with. Sand the hole inside with finer and finer sand paper i'd start at around 300grit and end with a wet sanding at 2000grit. then buff it silk smooth so you don't scratch your rings.

how to use:
cut rings, put ring in jig, push ring through with plunger. occasionally re-polish to keep scratch free.


maille Code V2.0 T8.3 R6.4 Ep.f Fper Mfe.s Wsg$ Cpw$ G0.25-2.5 I0.5-30 N31.31 Pa Dacdjw Xa27g37w1 S94

Joined: January 25, 2013
Posts: 72
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Location: US

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Posted on Mon Dec 09, 2013 4:45 am
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MaxumX wrote:
get your self a block of steel 1x1x0.5 ish.

drill a 5/16(or slightly smaller) hole through it. and then use a counter sink bit to off set the hole to the larger diameter. the counter sink should to be a high angle, 60 degrees prolly enough. Next make a little wood plunger to force the ring through with. Sand the hole inside with finer and finer sand paper i'd start at around 300grit and end with a wet sanding at 2000grit. then buff it silk smooth so you don't scratch your rings.

how to use:
cut rings, put ring in jig, push ring through with plunger. occasionally re-polish to keep scratch free.


Genius. Do you have any pictures?

Joined: January 25, 2013
Posts: 72
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Location: US

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Posted on Tue Dec 10, 2013 2:12 am
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Actually, if you drill a 5/16 inch hole, won't that make the OUTER diameter of the ring 5/16?

Joined: March 3, 2002
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Posted on Tue Dec 10, 2013 5:04 am
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Well, I never worry about the rings being perfectly round since most historical rings weren't. Linesman's or needle nose pliers have a rounded cutout to provide clearance for the cutters. Find one that's about 5/16" diameter and just wedge each ring into it then squeeze them closed. It gives a consistent overlap and you can machine a similar tool that's a bit more precise if you want perfectly round rings.


www.mailletec.com

Y'know, that might just be crazy enough to work!

Joined: March 27, 2002
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Posted on Wed Dec 11, 2013 6:38 pm
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My method is easy and it's uniform, but I can't call it fast.

Having coiled links on a 3/8" mandrel, then cut and flattened them, I plier-squeeze them down onto a 5/16" mandrel with needlenose pliers, though about any plier will do. Spring loaded pliers makes things easier. It's a process for when you're watching TV or something.

About the one mailling technical demand it makes is inspecting the link for size of overlap. Hand-cut links can vary, and I tweak these to arrive at a 3/16" link end overlap. Sometimes this makes a link too small or too large, and I gauge these quickie-like for what diameter they are closest to on the conical jaws of the needlenose pliers. Links that are really the next size down get used, maybe, for expansion links. Next size up gets culled and set aside for either some special use or some other mail project.

Waste is utterly minimal. I lose more links in the flattening step than any other if I don't aim my flattening hammer so good -- they vanish into the lawn, and unless they hit something when they fly I ain't getting them back.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

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