My fancy dress Hauberk for 2013
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Joined: November 24, 2011
Posts: 41
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Location: Belfast, NI

My fancy dress Hauberk for 2013
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Posted on Thu Aug 08, 2013 2:27 pm
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Hi folks.

I don't post terribly often, but when I complete something good, I like to come back and show it off here, in the place that had a great deal of
influence in my developing interest in medieval crafts.

This is my Hauberk for 2013.
UK medium
6mm ID 7.2mm OD
6 month build time
Alloy is 5056-H32

Thanks for viewing


[/img]

My original Hauberk was a 9mm ID 10.5mm OD build in galvanized steel, so my new one is a considerable improvement.
My next project is a coif with matching spec.

I have also learned how to make wedge riveted, flattened maile
so I may consider making an iron, battle ready hauberk
some time in the future. This might be hard to justify, since
I only wear for fancy dress.

Joined: July 17, 2009
Posts: 451
Submissions: 76
Location: Denver, Colorado

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Posted on Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:17 pm
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Very nice, Noel!

Can you give us the wire diameter too?

Would love to see some close up details of your workmanship too.



Joined: November 24, 2011
Posts: 41
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Location: Belfast, NI

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Posted on Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:47 pm
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Hi Pfeiffer

The wire diameter is 1.2mm or 16(?) in American gauge.
I choose 5056-H32 for it's tensile and weight properties.
My original plan was to make a Hauberk in 304 17/7 manually
tempering the rings but abandoned this idea pretty quickly
finding the 304 alloy just too dam hard, even in it's most
annealed state. It was actually wrecking all my tools such
is it's strength!

As for a more close up image, this is really the best I can
do right this instant.

http://i.imgur.com/Lnc3Sje.jpg

Joined: March 27, 2002
Posts: 3483
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Posted on Sun Aug 11, 2013 8:28 am
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Yeah, 16 in American Wire Gauge, which is for nonferrous, electric-wiring metals, notably aluminum, brass, and copper.

Steel Wire Gauge, also used in America, gauges guess what, and here in the rule of thumb for wires in this general gauge range, has your links more like 18ga SWG.

Yep, it's pretty bloody ad-hoc. Gauge makes a convenient quick verbal shorthand, but just sticking with measured wire diameter is almost as easy to say and much clearer in writing. Even the thickest of us can figure out millimeters.

Rather an impressive Pembridge-type helm you've got there. It rather wants a camailed mid-point bascinet beneath it, rather than a mere coif -- more authentic. You've got some of the core of a pretty solid 1375AD harness there. By that time, lots of plate, and haubergeons rather than hauberks ruled the day for mail.

The fourteenth-century originals -- two of the type have survived, the Pembridge helm and another clearly from the same shop, perhaps the same month, only a couple ounces different in weight, remarkable for something over six hundred years old! -- actually show less precise hole layout for the breaths in the ventail (face) plate than modern ones do. We moderns crisp it up a bit. That they drew a grid on the helm to locate the holes is clear enough -- but let's just remark that the hole-placement on the oldies is, um, casual. Their grid, I think, was drawn freehand without use of even a stretched chalk-twine to make things exact -- just the ol' Eyeball Mk I. Some of that casualness may have been a product of likely high Middle Ages holemaking methods -- like centerpunching a good pimple into the metal, then filing off the pimple until the hole was big enough. They didn't have twist drills... Vernon Dursley would have been unemployed.

5056 -- an aluminum alloy?

You can fix that inverted-V opening of the hauberk skirts with more work: since period art depicting men at arms never showed a V gap in hauberk skirts, but a slit only, you put on a couple of right triangles either side of each riders' slit, hypotenuses to centerline. Closes up the chink in the armor nicely. E4-1 will assume a tapering hang, and you have to compensate for it in something that hangs free as the hem of a hauberk does.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: March 27, 2002
Posts: 3483
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Posted on Sun Aug 11, 2013 8:56 am
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A riveted shirt, though, lets you well into the reenactor/Living History game. Demanding, but worth it too. England is rife with such.

The Americas haven't got the backdrops for this era of reenacting. Spanish America is all through the sixteenth century of course, but North America really didn't get going for colonization until the seventeenth -- so that's where most of our most ancient national stuff comes from. Local living history starts with Puritans and matchlocks, and eventually displaced Highlanders. Along with many Englishmen. War reenactors for us tend to concentrate around 1715, 1745, 1775-81, a little 1812, but especially 1861-65. Lots of muskets, at least one warship (the heavily-armed frigate Constitution still floats -- not unlike the Victory, and for the same reasons), few swords.


'The Minstrel Boy to the War is gone...'

Joined: November 24, 2011
Posts: 41
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Location: Belfast, NI

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Posted on Sun Aug 11, 2013 1:49 pm
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Hi Konstantin. I am not sure if it is correct to call 5056 an Aluminium
Alloy, or not. It is a combination of Al, Si, Fe, Cu, Mn, Cr, Mg, Zn.
and possess's a tensile strength of up to 290Mpa. Common in Aircraft
production and boat building etc. I could not obtain it in the UK and
had to go to a mill in China for it.

I find myself unable to commit to re-enactment and costuming groups.
I love fancy dress. but not enough to get all hardcore about it. My
intention with my knight costume is to produce something that at
least acknowledges and respects the era but not necessarily to mimic
it with perfection. I am aiming for beauty over perfection in this instance.

I have a 14th century costuming group working on a surcoat and a
mantle and wreath for my helmet. It will all be made of linen and will feature a nice lining too:



I am going to modify my pembridge helm, drilling holes in it's roof,
placing over it, a cap of sorts. The mantle and wreath will be placed
on top of the cap and then a statue will be mounted.



Not certain if this will be the exact statue, but it is all in reference
to the fact that I am an animal lover and so it says something
about me and will probably dazzle people at the same time.

Joined: January 13, 2013
Posts: 454
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Location: GA

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Posted on Sun Aug 11, 2013 6:41 pm
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Nicely done Smile

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