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Joined: November 16, 2011
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Re: Xuro Pliers
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Posted on Thu Nov 17, 2011 1:20 am
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Christine95693 wrote:
Do any of you put that Tool magic on your tools?


Yes. Not only does Tool Magic prevent scratches on the rings but also it keeps the rings from slipping out and shooting across the table. This is particularly important when using coated rings.

I have three pairs of pliers because the Tool Magic starts to wear off after about 20-30 minutes (depending on the weave). I re-dip my pliers right away and use the next pair while the first is drying. By the time I go through the third pair and take a little break, the first pair is ready to go.


Combining art and technique

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Posted on Thu Nov 17, 2011 1:51 am
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the other option is just wrapping boxing tape around the jaw. It's kind of bulky to work with but if your links are big and your tool magic manna is low it works in a snap.

Joined: August 30, 2008
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Posted on Thu Nov 17, 2011 1:55 am
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I'll say it again...

Even if you're working with "slippery" enamelled copper rings (these seem to be the ones people have trouble with the most)... Good Quality pliers, and a wee bit of practice weeds out the need to EVER use Tool Dip.

Think about it, spend $10 per pair of pliers... And never buy a jar of the stuff, or buy $5 pliers, and be stuck with purchasing a product to "improve" them, for life.

Cost/Benefit Analysis Complete. Coif LoL

(So sayeth the guy 10,000+ rings into an EC Inlay, who also works in 26g wire routinely)



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Posted on Thu Nov 17, 2011 7:49 am || Last edited by ZiLi on Thu Nov 17, 2011 4:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
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I usually have a dipped pair or two around, but to be honest: I don't use them very often - a sub-one-percent number of my rings is woven using dipped pliers. But I use EC not so often, as it's usually too soft for my taste. So they're used near to exclusively here, if I have to weave AA rings of a batch that is known by me to be flake prone. I use PlastiDip more for other purposes, like dipping plier handles, 'gluing' slipping grip scales to handles, making bar/C-clamps slip-safe, and so on...

My preference for smooth-surface pliers is to roughen the slick surface a bit, once they get too slippery. Simply pull sand paper through, just once, every couple of thousand rings...


-ZiLi-
Edit: Typo corrected


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper MAl Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Ps Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hip

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: November 25, 2010
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Posted on Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:17 am
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I found pliers with nylon jaws and replacement jaws at Widget Supply. Has anyone ever tried that type?

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Posted on Thu Nov 17, 2011 4:26 pm
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djgm wrote:
I found pliers with nylon jaws and replacement jaws at Widget Supply. Has anyone ever tried that type?


Far too wide for my tastes.

The jaws on Xuron 475's are even a little too wide for me a lot of the time, and they're the thinest pliers I own.



Joined: December 22, 2007
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Posted on Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:08 pm
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djgm wrote:
I found pliers with nylon jaws and replacement jaws at Widget Supply. Has anyone ever tried that type?

The only thing I have ever found those useful for is when I make findings, like ear wires or clasps. You can squeeze the finding between the nylon jaws quite hard without marring or crushing the metal. This makes them lay flat and look much more professional.


"I am a leaf on the wind." ~ Wash
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Posted on Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:26 pm
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Daemon_Lotos wrote:
I'll say it again...

Even if you're working with "slippery" enamelled copper rings (these seem to be the ones people have trouble with the most)... Good Quality pliers, and a wee bit of practice weeds out the need to EVER use Tool Dip.


Yup. I'm into a multi-thousand EC inlay myself...but I would say that it isn't even the "quality" of the pliers, it's using pliers that the individual can get a good grip on the rings with. For me that's a flat nosed...but curved chainnose can be good too. Then again, I'm a proponent of having many different types of pliers so that the proper ones for the job can be used.

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Posted on Fri Nov 18, 2011 3:40 am
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I'm not so worried about tight spots. I thought they might work for a 0.062" 5/16 AA project. I want to know if the nylon will wear quickly and I'll just spend a small fortune to replace it all the time.

Joined: August 30, 2008
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Posted on Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:23 am
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djgm wrote:
I'm not so worried about tight spots. I thought they might work for a 0.062" 5/16 AA project. I want to know if the nylon will wear quickly and I'll just spend a small fortune to replace it all the time.


It shouldn't... It will work fine...
I'd justbe leary about them becoming a crutch...
AA in that size is fairly manhandle-able... I mean, you can toss the bag of rings around, and use crappy pliers on them, and they won't scratch unless you're REALLY abusive.

When I did my Zelda inlay (http://www.mailleartisans.org/gallery/gallerydisplay.php?key=6262) I used two pairs of the cheapie TRL Branded wide-nose pliers, as I often do for bigger rings... And didn't have a spot of trouble with the coating.



Joined: November 25, 2010
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Posted on Fri Nov 18, 2011 1:05 pm
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ya I know what you mean. I just find when I take the time to baby every link it really slows me down. I think I need some nylon thimbles for my fingers. you can zoom through aluminum bare handed in that link size (till your fingers get raw).

Joined: May 07, 2008
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Posted on Fri Nov 18, 2011 1:52 pm
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Well, having good tools never hurts, as they often make it easier to achieve a given goal - and too bad tools may even inhibit the possibility to fulfill a given task in a quality level aimed at. But also don't forget, that even the best, most expensive tools available cannot guarantee good results, if the user's workmanship level has not yet reached the level needed to achieve these goals.

So it imho doesn't hurt for the beginning, to learn with less expensive, maybe 'sub-optimal' tools, and then finding ways to circumvent problems, developing a personal preferred work style, maybe modifying given or even building tools, maybe acquiring further tools that fit best to that style. It simply doesn't make much sense to buy expensive special tools, before you know whether you'll need or like them, but it makes always sense to buy decent quality basic tools, to have at least a better chance to reach your goals with.

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper MAl Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Ps Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hip

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: May 08, 2010
Posts: 1156
Submissions: 11
Location: Chesapeake, VA, USA

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Posted on Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:25 pm
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djgm wrote:
ya I know what you mean. I just find when I take the time to baby every link it really slows me down. I think I need some nylon thimbles for my fingers. you can zoom through aluminum bare handed in that link size (till your fingers get raw).


Wow, you must have some great hand strength. If I wanted to work aluminum with my bare hands, I don't think I could do anything above 0.032" wire. Laughing Then again, my hand strength has never been good.

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