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One Way of Cutting With a Jeweller's Saw
Article © MAIL User: Corvus

To cut with a jeweller's saw you will need:

An adjustable frame jeweller's saw -- adjustable is better because 'if' hahahahahaha WHEN you break the blades, you can still use the longer pieces.
Beeswax (or oil) -- I think beeswax is better, it makes less mess and is easy to clean off.
Image: saw1.jpg

Two blocks of wood with a channel cut into the top of each (I've also found a small piece of leather or rubber sheet useful to hold the coil in the blocks)--
Image: saw2.jpg

And a bench or craft vice to hold the wood --
Image: saw3.jpg

I use 6/0 saw blades; these are pretty thin but give a nice clean cut. You don't need to use blades this thin, it's personal choice. Here is a useful guide:
http://www.anvilfire.com/FAQs/jewelers_saw_blades.htm
Put the blade in the saw with the cutting edge facing away from you (the saw will cut better if it's doing most of the work when you push rather than pull. OK, This is how an EXPERIENCED JEWELLER told me to do it. NOT EVERYONE DOES IT THIS WAY, it's up to you! My reasons for doing it this way is that if you have the blade so that it cuts most when you pull, it opens up the coil, judders and is more likely to break the blade, if you have it so the blade cuts more when you push, it compresses the coil, no juddering and blade is less likely to break. I have tried it both ways.

Always, always lube the blade (and the coil if you want) with the beeswax (or oil), just run the wax up the blade a few times.

You'll need to do this several times for each coil, this helps to stop the blade breaking.

Sit down if you can, relax, hold the saw loosely and let the saw do the work (DO NOT put pressure on the blade, it cuts well without it and with it will break).

Run the blade up and down as much of its full length as you can.

Keep at it. It gets easier and quicker with practice.
Original URL: http://www.mailleartisans.org/articles/articledisplay.php?key=461